New meat names help us eat healthier

When I shop for meat, I look for the leanest cuts. I go armed with a list of options so I’m ready to tackle the daunting selection of cuts, sizes, and shapes. Despite my preparation, I sometimes turn to Google to see if the “London Broil” on sale is the same thing as the “extra lean top round” on my list (it is!). Image from sillypants.net

The confusion is about to come to an end. The National Pork Board and the Beef Checkoff Program is rolling out a new consumer-friendly naming system. Now, instead of “pork loin top loin chop,” labels will read “Porterhouse chop.” Rather than “beef shoulder top blade steak, boneless,” we’ll see “flatiron steak.” Retailers can either stick with the old, confusing system or upgrade to the new one. Because uniform names are anticipated to help with meat sales, this system will likely catch on quickly.

The new labels include the simplified name, species, characteristics, and preparation suggestions. (Image from independentmail.com)

Healthy eating advocates* must seize this opportunity. By simplifying the names, the beef and pork industries help nutrition activists clearly communicate which options are best for health. Unambiguous naming across retailers will allow the very lean pork tenderloin to sport the same label in most stores. The fatty New York Strip steak won’t be masquerading as Boneless Top Loin steak. Once shoppers learn the names of the few best options, they’ll be able to trust their knowledge and feel confident they’re choosing the lean cuts.

As soon as the new list is announced, advocates should publicize the names of the leanest options, lobby grocery stores to include the new names on their meat case signs and update their websites and materials to reflect the changes. If we are able to effectively explain that the new labeling system empowers shoppers to make consistent and confident choices each time they approach the meat case, we’ll go a long way to promote lean meat as a good option. Going one step further and ensuring our messaging lines up with the retail names enriches our materials and dietary recommendations.

Food industries don’t often make healthy eating easier. So let’s use this rare opportunity to facilitate sound nutrition communication and encourage wise choices.

*Though balanced vegetarian diets are the gold standard for healthy eating, consuming a light to moderate amount of meat seems to be a decent compromise for those of us who love a good steak now and then.

Updated 4/15/13: This video of Letterman playing a game called "Know Your Cuts of Meat" will be a whole lot easier now!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hB5W61rGQ38