Baby junk food

Because I don’t have children of my own and don’t personally know any babies, I rarely spend time looking at kid-specific food. However, the frozen section of my grocery store shares an aisle with baby food. And that’s where I found this:

Cheese doodles for little kids. Really little kids. Kids who are still learning how to pick things up and shove them in their mouths. This is baby junk food, pure and simple.

I didn’t want to believe parents would actually feed these to their kids, so I checked the source of the most candid reviews I know—Amazon. Turns out mild cheddar isn’t the only flavor. There’s also vegetable dip, ranch, and cinnamon maple, among others. The 88 reviewers love them all. 70% of reviewers gave them five out of five stars. I’ve chosen a few of my favorite remarks:

They are nutritious, and there may be better snacks out there, but for right now these are awesome.

It’s hard to keep him off of these—I have to literally hide the canister to control his intake LOL.

If I would let him, he’d probably eat the whole container! He whines and complains until he gets another one.

I call them baby Cheetos.

In the words of my Yiddish-speaking forbears: Oy vey.

I’m not a dietitian so I can’t make pronouncements about the relative healthiness of these snacks over others. But I did snap a photo of the nutrition label and ingredients list. The nutrient content seems fairly inoffensive, though light on vitamins and minerals. And get a load of that list!

crunchies2

Cheese seasoning is not an important part of your growing child’s diet, that’s for sure. Even those of us without an RD know that.

More troubling to me is that some of the parents who purchased Lil Crunchies chose the snack because it reminded them of Cheetos. Americans consume an alarming amount of junk food, and we have the obesity rates to prove it. In turn, as parents decide what to feed their children, Gerber is there with a can of cheesy snacks formulated just for baby.

I don’t blame parents for choosing this or any other snack food. Parents feed their children the best way they know how. They peruse the aisles, picking out the foods they think will be best for their child, nutritionally or just because it tastes good.

The real problem is that these products exist at all. Gerber’s website shows a seven page list of crackers and dips, cookies, fruit snacks, and freeze-dried yogurt. (To their credit, Gerber includes two lightly processed vegetable snacks called “Veggie Pick-ups” made of carrots and green beans.) These sweet and salty snacks set today’s kids up for a lifetime of choosing the adult versions of these foods. The snacks teach children that they should choose only foods that provide a kick of salt or sugar with every bite.

Illustration by Nathan Kuruna nathankuruna.com

So what should we do? I’m actually hopeful about this. We are working hard to fight obesity by encouraging Americans to make healthy choices. As more people start making changes, they will teach their children good habits. Letting go of the bag of chips takes time, though, and there’s a lot more work to be done. But I’m optimistic that if we continue to invest resources in nutrition education, we will see the benefits for generations.

 

Also, check me out today over at #PubHT talking about organ donation!