Friday Five: Oklahoma tornado, MERS, 3D printing, polio, live-tweeting surgery

Each Friday, I use  five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

Tornado in Moore, OK is the latest national disaster

On Monday, a mile wide tornado with 200+ mph winds decimated Moore, OK. Approximately 10,000 people were directly affected, 240 injured, and 24 killed, including nine children. Reports of heroism abound, as do shocking photos. Coming just months after the shooting at Sandy Hook and weeks after the Boston Marathon bombing, the Moore tornado victims may find themselves on the losing end of American disaster fatigue. Hopefully Moore will stay in the forefront of American’s minds and not blend in with other communities rebuilding from natural and human-made tragedies.

 

MERS is on the move

After a slow march toward notoriety, MERS is becoming a real threat. This novel coronavirus dubbed Middle East Respiratory Syndrome has been confirmed in 44 people across multiple countries and caused 22 deaths. In this month alone, two new outbreak clusters surfaced—one in Saudi Arabia infected 22 people and killed 10, the other in France infected two, one of whom contracted MERS from a hospital roommate. However, the exact mode of transmission, incubation period, and reservoir (meaning whether or not the virus lives someplace outside of humans) are unknown and research is stymied due to restrictions placed on the virus by Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands. For a virus with a 50% mortality rate so far, this is an egregious example of the problems with commercializing organisms needed for public health research. How many others will fall ill and die because of Erasmus’s patent?

 

Child’s life is saved by 3D printed trachea splint

In a groundbreaking and heartwarming use of the new technology of 3D printing, University of Michigan researchers created and implanted a trachea splint in a young child. Kaiba Gionnfrido, who had spent nearly all of his 20-month long life in a hospital on a respirator due to his trachobrochomalacia, or the softening and subsequent collapse of the windpipe. The splint, made to fit Kaiba perfectly, will give structure to his trachea to allow it to grow and is composed of a biopolymer that will be absorbed by his body in about three years. After years of requiring daily resuscitation, the splint allowed Kaiba to come off the respirator three weeks later. We can look forward to the emerging practice of saving lives using 3D printing to create custom-made medical devices.

 

Polio in Kenya and Somalia threatens eradication effort

A four-month old girl developed symptoms of paralysis and two other children tested positive for polio in a Kenyan refugee camp. Just a few weeks ago, Somalia reported its first wild case in five years. Vaccination rates in these areas are low, and nearly 500,000 people travel to and from the Kenyan refugee camp annually, increasing risk for an epidemic. This development complicates the newly adopted six year plan for polio eradication, and mass vaccination campaigns in the area are underway in hopes of containing the virus. Maintaining vaccination in vulnerable areas, even after years pass with no new infections, is crucial to destroying polio forever.

 

Brain surgery documented on Twitter and Vine

In this week’s example of how social media is revolutionizing health care and medicine, UCLA Hospital live tweeted Vine videos of brain surgery. Brad Carter, an actor and musician, underwent awake brain surgery to implant a pacemaker to calm his essential tremors. The Vine videos show distinct improvement in Carter’s guitar playing once the pacemaker was in place. By using Twitter and Vine to document the surgery, UCLA surgeons and Carter do the public a great service—showing exactly how incredible medicine can be. The videos inspire awe while simultaneously taking some of the mystery out of surgery.

 

This week's song to celebrate the end of the week: The Cure's "Friday I'm in Love"

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b69XWDUtMew]