Friday Five: Transplant ethics, Planned Parenthood, Hepatitis C, immigrants, Google

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Child in dire need of lung transplants starts a debate on ethics

Ten year old Sarah Murnaghan has been waiting for lung transplants for 18 months due to her cystic fibrosis and related lung failure. Doctors say she is not likely to live past the weekend without a transplant, so the severity of her illness placed her at the top of the pediatric list. However, Sarah is on very bottom of the adult list, meaning that any adults in need of lungs will be offered the organs before her, regardless of whether or not their need is as pressing as hers. Since 2005, organs are supposed to be distributed based on need, but that rule applies only to patients over age 12. Sarah’s parents have petitioned Kathleen Sebelius to change the rules to allow pediatric transplants of adult organs based not on age but on medical necessity. Hopefully, Sarah’s dire situation will ignite a conversation on organ donation and the ethics of treating children as if they are adults. (Okay, so this is six sentences but I think it’s worth it.)

Planned Parenthood case will not be heard by the Supreme Court

Indiana tried—and failed—to refuse Medicaid funding to Planned Parenthood. The Supreme Court refused to consider an appeal on behalf of the state to allow Indiana to withhold money from Planned Parenthood because it offers abortion services, even though federal law prohibits Medicaid dollars from being spent on abortion. Hopefully, this development will stall other attacks on low-income women’s right to choose their health care providers. However, the wily anti-choice movement is probably cooking up other ways to deny services to women—Indiana already has a law in place requiring facilities that offer non-surgical abortions to meet the same standards as facilities that perform surgical abortions. The Supreme Court’s choice not to hear the appeal is important, but as usual, fighting against restrictions on this legal medical procedure is a constant battle.

Is the “war on drugs” to blame for millions of Hepatitis C cases?

The Global Commission on Drug Policy called for an end on “the war on drugs,” in part because criminalization of injection drugs has lead to a quiet epidemic of Hepatitis C. The Commission estimates that of the 16 million injecting drug users (IDUs), 10 million are living with Hepatitis C; China, the Russian Federation, and the USA have the highest rates of Hepatitis C among IDUs. Arguing that harsh drug laws dissuade IDUs away from public health efforts such as needle exchanges, the Commission recommends reforming existing drug laws and focusing on health rather than incarceration and forced treatment. While I doubt many countries will decriminalize heroin and other injectable drugs, I’m pleased the Commission is drawing attention to the broader health concerns of IDUs. Regardless of drug use or dependence, a person has a right to access public health initiatives without fearing arrest and imprisonment.

Immigrants subsidize Medicare

A study published in June’s Health Affairs showed that in 2009 naturalized and non-citizen immigrants contributed $33 billion to the Medicare trust fund and received $19 billion in expenditures, creating a surplus of $14 billion. American-born citizens, on the other hand, contributed $192 billion and used $223 billion, creating a deficit of $31 billion. There are a few reasons why immigrants’ contributions lead to surplus: there are 6.5 working immigrants for every one retired immigrant and the cost of care for immigrants is less than the cost of care for the American-born. In a time when immigration and a path to citizenship are pressing issues, focusing on the positive contributions of new residents and citizens can only help decision makers to make choices to encourage new immigration. This study reminds us that immigration is crucial to the success and longevity of the United States, and treating all immigrants with respect and dignity is non-negotiable.

Google nutrition facts and get a clear answer

This coming week, Google is launching a new search feature: type a question about nutrition facts, and it provide you with a precise answer. The screen shots look much like the results when Googling conversions from cups to liters or the definition of a word. The feature is rolling out in the United States over the next ten days, but it shown up yet in Philadelphia so I haven’t been able to give it a try myself. Having the ability to ask direct questions about the nutrient content of food helps demystify some of the complicated information about healthy eating. This is health communication done right!

If you're looking to change up your workout routine this weekend, may I suggest Prancercise?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-50GjySwew