Friday Five: Marketplace, Olympians’ teeth, Wikipedia, sprinklers, McDonalds

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

The Health Insurance Marketplace is open for business

The day is finally here: the Health Insurance Marketplace is open! I’d hoped to poke around a little and report on what I saw, but the site is so busy I haven’t yet been able to get past this page:

alot_of_visitors

The fact that the site has been overloaded with visitors for the past four days shows us that we are ready to buy insurance and are on board with the Affordable Care Act. We’ll still have to work through some bugs, I’m sure, but I’m glad to see so many Americans are excited about this new option. Once I get past the waiting page, I’ll be sure to let you know how things work in the Marketplace.

Brush and floss twice a day…even you, Olympians!

According to a study just published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, athletes competing at the 2012 London Olympics who visited the athlete’s village dental clinic had surprisingly bad teeth. Of those people examined, 55% had cavities, 45% had lost some tooth enamel, 76% had gingivitis, and 15% had periodontitis. A full 40% of athletes were “bothered” by their oral health, and 18% admitted their dental problems caused issues with training and athletic performance. While we hold up these Olympians as paragons of health and fitness, their teeth tell us another story. Oral health is an indicator of overall health, and perhaps focusing intently on training is leading them to disregard other important aspects of their health.

Earn credit for editing Wikipedia at UCSF medical school

The medical school at University of California, San Fransisco (UCSF) is offering a unique course to its fourth year students: editing medical Wikipedia articles. They are working with Wikiproject Medicine to add citations and increase the accuracy of the 100 most popular medical articles on Wikipedia. Health care providers use Wikipedia often, and medical students have an abundance of information—so it makes sense for the students to contribute their knowledge for the good of site they’ll use frequently in their practice. UCSF is the first medical school to link Wikipedia’s education goals with course credit. Hopefully, the combined knowledge of the nation’s medical students can be used to help all of us understand the details of razor burn (the #1 most-viewed medical page).

Nursing homes need sprinklers

Medicare and Medicaid require all new nursing homes or additions to a nursing homes to have automatic sprinkler systems. Older nursing homes did not have any regulation regarding fire suppression or sprinklers until August 2008, and they were given five years to comply with the rule. Now that those five years have passed, approximately 1000 facilities have “partial” systems, and about 125 have no sprinklers at all. Considering nursing home residents often have mobility issues, an uncontrolled fire in one of the facilities would be devastating. If you know of a nursing home that does not have a proper sprinkler system, I suggest calling CARIE (I did my summer internship at CARIE; they’re wonderful) and talk with the ombudsmen there to help ensure the safety of the residents.

Happy Meals just got a little happier

This week, McDonalds announced major changes to its menus—value meals can now be accompanied by salad, fruit, or vegetable in lieu of fries, Happy Meals will no longer be promoted with soda but instead with milk, juice, or water, and advertising and packaging for children will encourage wellness and good nutrition. The changes will be made in McDonalds’ 20 major markets across the world, which comprise 85% of global sales. The most important part of these changes is the addition of choice. Adults and children alike will be able to choose salad instead of fries, water rather than soda. Having these choices available—and encouraged—will help fulfill the public health goal of making the healthy choice the easy choice.