Friday Five: Salmonella, abortion, bubonic plague, rabies, Tom Hanks

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

Government shutdown, Foster Farms, and drug-resistant Salmonella

Foster Farms—a chicken processor who was the source of a Salmonella outbreak earlier this year—has been implicated in selling meat that has sickened at least 278 people in 17 states. Although the processor insists the problem is due to consumers insufficiently cooking their chicken, they have decided to revamp their procedures rather than be shut down by the USDA. This particular outbreak consists of seven strains of Salmonella, four of which are drug resistant—and due to the government shutdown, the CDC cannot properly investigate the problem and may be missing information that could reduce illness or save lives. This is a perfect example of a useful government program that should be funded regardless of politics…salmonella doesn’t care if you vote red or blue.

 

Abortion news

There’s lots going on this week regarding abortion. A woman who will have to leave the country to terminate her pregnancy since she is carrying twins who have anencephaly is highlighting Northern Ireland’s total ban on abortion. Ohio passed a budget that included three abortion restrictions, and the ACLU is suing the state, claiming the rules have nothing to do with the budget and are unconstitutional. The Nebraska Supreme Court upheld a ruling stating a pregnant foster child was not mature enough to elect to have an abortion, so she must deliver the baby and place it for adoption. Arsonists have tried to attach the Planned Parenthood in Joplin, Missouri twice in one week. Finally, some good news: California expanded access for abortions by allowing nurse practitioners, physician’s assistants, and certified nurse-midwives to perform abortions.

 

Bubonic plague may be an issue for Madagascar

Unless Madagascar gets its rat population under control, it’s likely to face a bubonic plague epidemic starting this month. That’s right, the Black Death is endemic in the island nation. Rats abound in the main prison, and the concern is that if the bacteria is introduced to those rats, the fleas they carry will be able to spread bubonic plague to inmates, employees, and visitors. And you can’t just kill rats—you have to kill the fleas, too. No word on what’s being done to avert this potential disaster.

 

Rabies vaccines are way too pricey

Fewer than 10 people have been documented as surviving full-blown rabies, but if a person who has been bitten receives the rabies vaccine before serious symptoms develop, they are likely to survive. Rabies kills about 24,000 people, mostly children, annually across Africa (approximately 26,000 die in Asia). Rabies experts at a conference this week in Dakar, Senegal suggested the best preventive measure is to tie up dogs since the post-bite treatment is cost prohibitive to most people who are bitten in Africa. The treatment requires four or five injections that cost about $13 each. Seems to me that rabies vaccine manufacturers Sanofi Pasteur and Novartis should be striking a deal with someone to lower these costs and save a huge number of lives.

 

Tom Hanks has Type 2 diabetes

During an interview with Dave Letterman, America’s favorite actor Tom Hanks announced he has Type 2 diabetes due to years of uncontrolled high blood sugar. Hanks doesn’t blame his weight fluctuations for movie roles, but says, “I think it goes back to the lifestyle I’ve been leading since I was probably seven, not 36.”  He joins the ranks of Paula Deen, Randy Jackson, Billie Jean King, Patti LaBelle, Larry King, and 25.8 million Americans. Can you imagine if Paula Deen, Larry King, and Tom Hanks did a diabetes prevention campaign? That’d be TV ratings gold.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBhZoTN2bvM