Raw milk, cholera, and Appalachia: Cool stuff I read this week

I came across a bunch of interesting articles and bits of news this week, and I thought I’d share them with you. Spend your lazy Sunday catching up on current events. The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee released its recommendations this week. They encourage us to eat less sugar and saturated fat, but say we don’t really need to worry about our cholesterol intake.

There’s a new rapid test for Ebola.

Speaking of Ebola, Al Jazeera America ran a fascinating and discouraging two-part series on the social implications of the epidemic.

Although Haiti has improved its infrastructure in response to the epidemic, cholera is still a major problem in the country.

This interview with the Baltimore City health commissioner Dr. Leana Wen reminds us that public health isn’t just about Ebola and cholera and measles--it’s also about rat control and the social determinants of health. [Audio and abridged transcript.]

Flu season is starting to wind down.

The first broad study of two kinds of muscular dystrophy was published, revealing important epidemiological information about the disorders.

Despite some progress, Appalachia is still teeming with health disparities and poverty.

There’s a new tickborne virus in town.

For goodness’ sake, stop drinking raw milk. Pasteurization exists for a reason!

More than 25% of Americans with diabetes are undiagnosed. That’s 8.1 million diabetics who are not receiving treatment or making lifestyle changes.

Thank you, Alan Cumming, for using humor to highlight just how ridiculous the FDA’s new ruling restricting gay and bisexual men from donating blood unless they have been celibate for a year.

Alan Cumming Celibacy Challenge

 

Come back tomorrow for another Awesome Infographic!