Did you forget about Ebola?

Ebola Ebola was big news in 2014. But we seem to have lost interest in it, especially now that no one in the US is being treated for the virus. While the number of cases in African countries is dropping, the epidemic and its repercussions are far from over. In fact, there are still important developments happening every day.

A promising new treatment An experimental antiviral drug has shown potential for treating early cases of Ebola. Favipiravir, which has also shown to be effective against influenza, West Nile, and yellow fever as well as other viruses, seems to drastically reduce mortality in patients who are not yet seriously ill. It doesn’t seem to help patients with severe Ebola infection. One of the most important advantages of favipiravir is that it is a pill. Other potential therapies must be kept frozen and are administered through infusion, leaving the health care worker at risk for needle sticks.

Red Cross aid workers suffer from attacks in Guinea In Guinea, public misconceptions about the role of aid workers and the mode of Ebola transmission have led to attacks on Red Cross and other volunteers conducting safe burials of deceased Ebola patients. While many Guineans understand and accept the practices the Red Cross uses to disinfect homes and bury Ebola victims, some are concerned that the Red Cross is actually spreading the virus. This has resulted in an average of 10 attacks per month. The Red Cross is warning that the violence against its volunteers is hampering its ability to contain and quell the epidemic.

Maybe Ebola can be transmitted through aerosols, but probably not One of the best things about this 28 day writing challenge is that through my research I found Carl Zimmer. I aspire to his level of health writing clarity and scientific rigour. His piece “Is It Worth Imagining Airborne Ebola?” does an excellent job of outlining the concerns expressed by a few scientists while also offering the counterpoints that help give those concerns context. Before you get carried away with alarmist headlines, take a look at what he has to say.

From soap and water to soap opera Sierra Leone is starting to move from the traditional forms of public health communication to a more innovative medium. Celebrities are partnering with a major bank to create a soap opera designed to help prevent transmission, explain treatment and safe burial practices, and dispelling myths about Ebola. One of the twelve episodes focuses on quarantine by centering around a family who is under quarantine. Through this storyline, the actors explain what happens during a quarantine and why adherence to it is crucial. In the major city of Freetown, the soap opera is broadcast on television, while in more rural areas, it plays on the radio.

Right now, the Ebola epidemic seems to be waning. However, this epidemic will resonate throughout the region for decades. Even as new public health issues surface, we would be well-served to remember what has and is happening in this part of Africa.