Friday Five: Salmonella, abortion, bubonic plague, rabies, Tom Hanks

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

Government shutdown, Foster Farms, and drug-resistant Salmonella

Foster Farms—a chicken processor who was the source of a Salmonella outbreak earlier this year—has been implicated in selling meat that has sickened at least 278 people in 17 states. Although the processor insists the problem is due to consumers insufficiently cooking their chicken, they have decided to revamp their procedures rather than be shut down by the USDA. This particular outbreak consists of seven strains of Salmonella, four of which are drug resistant—and due to the government shutdown, the CDC cannot properly investigate the problem and may be missing information that could reduce illness or save lives. This is a perfect example of a useful government program that should be funded regardless of politics…salmonella doesn’t care if you vote red or blue.

 

Abortion news

There’s lots going on this week regarding abortion. A woman who will have to leave the country to terminate her pregnancy since she is carrying twins who have anencephaly is highlighting Northern Ireland’s total ban on abortion. Ohio passed a budget that included three abortion restrictions, and the ACLU is suing the state, claiming the rules have nothing to do with the budget and are unconstitutional. The Nebraska Supreme Court upheld a ruling stating a pregnant foster child was not mature enough to elect to have an abortion, so she must deliver the baby and place it for adoption. Arsonists have tried to attach the Planned Parenthood in Joplin, Missouri twice in one week. Finally, some good news: California expanded access for abortions by allowing nurse practitioners, physician’s assistants, and certified nurse-midwives to perform abortions.

 

Bubonic plague may be an issue for Madagascar

Unless Madagascar gets its rat population under control, it’s likely to face a bubonic plague epidemic starting this month. That’s right, the Black Death is endemic in the island nation. Rats abound in the main prison, and the concern is that if the bacteria is introduced to those rats, the fleas they carry will be able to spread bubonic plague to inmates, employees, and visitors. And you can’t just kill rats—you have to kill the fleas, too. No word on what’s being done to avert this potential disaster.

 

Rabies vaccines are way too pricey

Fewer than 10 people have been documented as surviving full-blown rabies, but if a person who has been bitten receives the rabies vaccine before serious symptoms develop, they are likely to survive. Rabies kills about 24,000 people, mostly children, annually across Africa (approximately 26,000 die in Asia). Rabies experts at a conference this week in Dakar, Senegal suggested the best preventive measure is to tie up dogs since the post-bite treatment is cost prohibitive to most people who are bitten in Africa. The treatment requires four or five injections that cost about $13 each. Seems to me that rabies vaccine manufacturers Sanofi Pasteur and Novartis should be striking a deal with someone to lower these costs and save a huge number of lives.

 

Tom Hanks has Type 2 diabetes

During an interview with Dave Letterman, America’s favorite actor Tom Hanks announced he has Type 2 diabetes due to years of uncontrolled high blood sugar. Hanks doesn’t blame his weight fluctuations for movie roles, but says, “I think it goes back to the lifestyle I’ve been leading since I was probably seven, not 36.”  He joins the ranks of Paula Deen, Randy Jackson, Billie Jean King, Patti LaBelle, Larry King, and 25.8 million Americans. Can you imagine if Paula Deen, Larry King, and Tom Hanks did a diabetes prevention campaign? That’d be TV ratings gold.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBhZoTN2bvM

 

Friday Five: heat, Bloomberg, Texas, heroin, ACA

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Let’s all do the heat wave! Just in case you’ve ignored the Facebook status updates, tweets, and complaints from co-workers, I want to inform you that it is Very Hot Outside. Growing up in Florida gives a person a skewed sense of the appropriate level of summertime heat and humidity, but this week has been tough even for me. In all seriousness, the heat is severe and dangerous, especially because so many people in the affected areas (map) don’t have air conditioning. So follow the heat advisory instructions: stay inside, run that AC (if you have it), drink water, and check in on seniors—they’re especially susceptible to high temperatures. And remember, we’ll all look back fondly this week while we wait for snow plows in January.

Bloomberg’s at it again But this time, he just wants New Yorkers to bypass the elevator and take the stairs instead. Mayor Bloomberg signed an executive order on Wednesday that requires all government building to be laid out using “Active Design” principles in order to promote physical activity like taking the stairs. We often talk in public health about making the healthy choice the easy choice and changing the built environment to encourage physical fitness. Bloomberg’s latest move may spark an interest in healthier buildings. Could Active Design be the new LEED certification?

You haven’t heard the whole story about Texas This was a big week for abortion controversy in Texas, and there’s already extensive coverage of what happened, so here’s some news you may have missed:

  •  You can now purchase Rick Perry voodoo dolls (cultural appropriation isn’t just for Miley Cyrus)
  • Texas Democrat Rep. Harold Dutton introduced a bill that would ban all abortion legislation until the state abolishes the death penalty.
  • The pink running shoes Wendy Davis wore during her filibuster have over 280 positive reviews on Amazon, and not all of them extol the arch support.

What did I miss?

Heroin’s popularity is growing in Northern New England In New Hampshire, the number of fatal heroin overdoses jumped from just seven in 2003 to a surprising 40 in 2012. The increase has also been observed in Vermont, with a 40% increase in heroin addiction treatment, and Maine, which had three times the heroin overdoses in 2012 as in 2011. There are a few factors that may contribute to this growing problem: increased control over prescription painkillers, the relative cheapness of heroin compared to painkillers, and because heroin can be sold at a higher price in rural areas than in urban centers, distributors are incentivized to sell more. Heroin is now taking up most of drug enforcement agents’ time in the area. Controlling infectious diseases like HIV and Hepatitis C will be the next challenge for the area’s public health community.

Curious about what’s happening next with the ACA? Kaiser Family Foundation released a new ACA video starring its charming YouToons. This one, a follow up to 2010’s “Health Reform Meets Main Street,” explains how to “Get Ready for Obamacare.” (Interesting, the change in terminology over three years!) This easy to understand breakdown of the complicated law is accessible to all audiences. Anyone talking to the public should be emulating this kind of clear communication. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZkk6ueZt-U

Friday Five: Transplant ethics, Planned Parenthood, Hepatitis C, immigrants, Google

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Child in dire need of lung transplants starts a debate on ethics

Ten year old Sarah Murnaghan has been waiting for lung transplants for 18 months due to her cystic fibrosis and related lung failure. Doctors say she is not likely to live past the weekend without a transplant, so the severity of her illness placed her at the top of the pediatric list. However, Sarah is on very bottom of the adult list, meaning that any adults in need of lungs will be offered the organs before her, regardless of whether or not their need is as pressing as hers. Since 2005, organs are supposed to be distributed based on need, but that rule applies only to patients over age 12. Sarah’s parents have petitioned Kathleen Sebelius to change the rules to allow pediatric transplants of adult organs based not on age but on medical necessity. Hopefully, Sarah’s dire situation will ignite a conversation on organ donation and the ethics of treating children as if they are adults. (Okay, so this is six sentences but I think it’s worth it.)

Planned Parenthood case will not be heard by the Supreme Court

Indiana tried—and failed—to refuse Medicaid funding to Planned Parenthood. The Supreme Court refused to consider an appeal on behalf of the state to allow Indiana to withhold money from Planned Parenthood because it offers abortion services, even though federal law prohibits Medicaid dollars from being spent on abortion. Hopefully, this development will stall other attacks on low-income women’s right to choose their health care providers. However, the wily anti-choice movement is probably cooking up other ways to deny services to women—Indiana already has a law in place requiring facilities that offer non-surgical abortions to meet the same standards as facilities that perform surgical abortions. The Supreme Court’s choice not to hear the appeal is important, but as usual, fighting against restrictions on this legal medical procedure is a constant battle.

Is the “war on drugs” to blame for millions of Hepatitis C cases?

The Global Commission on Drug Policy called for an end on “the war on drugs,” in part because criminalization of injection drugs has lead to a quiet epidemic of Hepatitis C. The Commission estimates that of the 16 million injecting drug users (IDUs), 10 million are living with Hepatitis C; China, the Russian Federation, and the USA have the highest rates of Hepatitis C among IDUs. Arguing that harsh drug laws dissuade IDUs away from public health efforts such as needle exchanges, the Commission recommends reforming existing drug laws and focusing on health rather than incarceration and forced treatment. While I doubt many countries will decriminalize heroin and other injectable drugs, I’m pleased the Commission is drawing attention to the broader health concerns of IDUs. Regardless of drug use or dependence, a person has a right to access public health initiatives without fearing arrest and imprisonment.

Immigrants subsidize Medicare

A study published in June’s Health Affairs showed that in 2009 naturalized and non-citizen immigrants contributed $33 billion to the Medicare trust fund and received $19 billion in expenditures, creating a surplus of $14 billion. American-born citizens, on the other hand, contributed $192 billion and used $223 billion, creating a deficit of $31 billion. There are a few reasons why immigrants’ contributions lead to surplus: there are 6.5 working immigrants for every one retired immigrant and the cost of care for immigrants is less than the cost of care for the American-born. In a time when immigration and a path to citizenship are pressing issues, focusing on the positive contributions of new residents and citizens can only help decision makers to make choices to encourage new immigration. This study reminds us that immigration is crucial to the success and longevity of the United States, and treating all immigrants with respect and dignity is non-negotiable.

Google nutrition facts and get a clear answer

This coming week, Google is launching a new search feature: type a question about nutrition facts, and it provide you with a precise answer. The screen shots look much like the results when Googling conversions from cups to liters or the definition of a word. The feature is rolling out in the United States over the next ten days, but it shown up yet in Philadelphia so I haven’t been able to give it a try myself. Having the ability to ask direct questions about the nutrient content of food helps demystify some of the complicated information about healthy eating. This is health communication done right!

If you're looking to change up your workout routine this weekend, may I suggest Prancercise?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-50GjySwew