Action Phase Podcast Episode 18

health insurance marketplaceOn this episode, I sit down with Nancy O’Connor, Regional Administrator for CMS Region 3. We talk about why people without health insurance really need to get some ASAP, why Medicaid expansion is really important, and that if you already have health insurance, you can sit back and relax. Remember: the health insurance Marketplace closes March 31! If you’re visiting for the first time via The Public’s Health, welcome! I hope you enjoy the show.

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As always, you can stream it here, too.

https://ia601202.us.archive.org/13/items/18-NancyOconnor-ActionPhasePodcast/18-NancyOconnor-ActionPhasePodcast.mp3

Friday Five: Cigarettes, taxes, cancelled insurance, krokodil, pre-term births

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. This time, it's Bloomberg-heavy!  

New Yorkers have to be 21 to buy cigarettes

In what may be his last public health move before leaving office, New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg is set to sign a bill that will raise the purchasing age of nicotine products to 21. The bill covers cigarettes, e-cigarettes, cigars, and cigarillos. About 90% of adult smokers become smokers before age 20, so I understand the public health rationale. However, I question whether it is ethical to make a product illegal for some adults to purchase based simply on the person’s age. The fallout from this soon-to-be law will help frame tobacco laws around the country, and I’m eager to see what happens next.

 

Mexico creates a junk food tax

Mexico has one of the highest rates of overweight and obese citizens—higher than even the United States. This week, the Mexican Congress approved a bill adding an 8% tax to all “high-calorie” foods like potato chips and sweets and a one peso/liter (about $0.08) tax to all soft drinks. The tax initiative was funded in part by Michael Bloomberg’s foundation. It is resolutely opposed by Femsa, the Mexican manufacturer and distributor of Coca-Cola, and Bimbo, which owns Sara Lee, Entenmann’s, and other processed food companies. Hopefully, when the costs inevitably are passed along to consumers, consumption of these items will fall and the population move toward a healthier weight.

 

Some health insurance plans have been cancelled due to the ACA

Before the implementation of the ACA, about 5% of Americans purchased health insurance individually. Many of these plans are now being cancelled because they do not fit the requirements all plans must meet under the new law. There’s lots of outrage, particularly at President Obama, because people feel misled. It’s pretty clear what’s happening: there’s a combination of insurance companies ended “grandfathered” plans early (which is their decision, not mandated by the ACA) and plans being cancelled because they were purchased after the “grandfathering” date and therefore are not legal. For an excellent flowchart showing how and why this is happening, Jon Lovett made an intricate one.

 

Pre-term birth rates fall again

The US pre-term birth rate fell to a 15 year low of 11.5%, or 1 in 9, in 2012. Although we still have the worst pre-term birth rate of all the industrialized nations, this is a positive development. This is the sixth year in which the rates declined, but the reasons why are not clear. Pre-term, low birth weight, and very low birth weight babies can have developmental delays, need more care, and cost more—on average, about $51,600. For more detailed information, see the March of Dimes 2013 Premature Birth Report Card.

 

Appearance of krokodil may be a false alarm in the US

(Warning: DO NOT Google image search for krokodil. Trust me.)

A month or two ago, the internet was abuzz with reports of people losing body parts to a new drug, krokodil. This homemade heroin substitute popular in rural Russia causes horrible sores that lead to severe disfigurement. A few cases popped up in a number of states earlier this year, but now the DEA suggests these were heroin use-related problems, like staph or MRSA infections at the users’ injection sites. Compounding the skepticism is the fact that in some places, a dose of heroin costs only $5 (!!!), virtually eliminating the need for even the most desperate user to knowingly inject his or herself with krokodil. Here’s to hoping that it really hasn’t shown up here, and that this interest we now have leads to getting actual krokodil users help.

Friday Five: Marketplace, Olympians’ teeth, Wikipedia, sprinklers, McDonalds

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

The Health Insurance Marketplace is open for business

The day is finally here: the Health Insurance Marketplace is open! I’d hoped to poke around a little and report on what I saw, but the site is so busy I haven’t yet been able to get past this page:

alot_of_visitors

The fact that the site has been overloaded with visitors for the past four days shows us that we are ready to buy insurance and are on board with the Affordable Care Act. We’ll still have to work through some bugs, I’m sure, but I’m glad to see so many Americans are excited about this new option. Once I get past the waiting page, I’ll be sure to let you know how things work in the Marketplace.

Brush and floss twice a day…even you, Olympians!

According to a study just published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, athletes competing at the 2012 London Olympics who visited the athlete’s village dental clinic had surprisingly bad teeth. Of those people examined, 55% had cavities, 45% had lost some tooth enamel, 76% had gingivitis, and 15% had periodontitis. A full 40% of athletes were “bothered” by their oral health, and 18% admitted their dental problems caused issues with training and athletic performance. While we hold up these Olympians as paragons of health and fitness, their teeth tell us another story. Oral health is an indicator of overall health, and perhaps focusing intently on training is leading them to disregard other important aspects of their health.

Earn credit for editing Wikipedia at UCSF medical school

The medical school at University of California, San Fransisco (UCSF) is offering a unique course to its fourth year students: editing medical Wikipedia articles. They are working with Wikiproject Medicine to add citations and increase the accuracy of the 100 most popular medical articles on Wikipedia. Health care providers use Wikipedia often, and medical students have an abundance of information—so it makes sense for the students to contribute their knowledge for the good of site they’ll use frequently in their practice. UCSF is the first medical school to link Wikipedia’s education goals with course credit. Hopefully, the combined knowledge of the nation’s medical students can be used to help all of us understand the details of razor burn (the #1 most-viewed medical page).

Nursing homes need sprinklers

Medicare and Medicaid require all new nursing homes or additions to a nursing homes to have automatic sprinkler systems. Older nursing homes did not have any regulation regarding fire suppression or sprinklers until August 2008, and they were given five years to comply with the rule. Now that those five years have passed, approximately 1000 facilities have “partial” systems, and about 125 have no sprinklers at all. Considering nursing home residents often have mobility issues, an uncontrolled fire in one of the facilities would be devastating. If you know of a nursing home that does not have a proper sprinkler system, I suggest calling CARIE (I did my summer internship at CARIE; they’re wonderful) and talk with the ombudsmen there to help ensure the safety of the residents.

Happy Meals just got a little happier

This week, McDonalds announced major changes to its menus—value meals can now be accompanied by salad, fruit, or vegetable in lieu of fries, Happy Meals will no longer be promoted with soda but instead with milk, juice, or water, and advertising and packaging for children will encourage wellness and good nutrition. The changes will be made in McDonalds’ 20 major markets across the world, which comprise 85% of global sales. The most important part of these changes is the addition of choice. Adults and children alike will be able to choose salad instead of fries, water rather than soda. Having these choices available—and encouraged—will help fulfill the public health goal of making the healthy choice the easy choice.

Friday Five: Lea-Ann Ellison, antibiotic resistance, apps, medical marijuana, adorableness

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

Surprise! Lifting weights while pregnant is controversial

Americans do a great job of finding reasons to criticize women, especially when it comes to reproduction and motherhood. This week, we were subjected to a wave of judgment about Lea-Ann Ellison, who has the audacity to lift weights while 33 weeks pregnant. She says her doctor is fine with her exercise. Pregnant women are told to continue being active, and that’s exactly what she’s doing. If her doctor—not the ones quoted by media outlets—deem her exercise intensity level safe, then we should butt out.

 

Antibiotic resistance is going to be a big problem

A first-of-its-kind report from the CDC on the status of antibiotic resistance classifies 18 microorganisms as “urgent,” “serious,” or “concerning” in their ability to fight antibiotics. The list includes everyone’s favorite infections: gonorrhea, typhoid, and tuberculosis. Antibiotics are one of the most important reasons our life expectancy has grown, and losing the ability to kill bacteria will certainly mean more severe illness. This is a great opportunity for primary prevention (preventing illness before it starts); strategies such as advocating for condom use, safe food handling practices, and vaccines will be necessary. Meanwhile, doctors should be discerning about prescribing antibiotics, and we must invest more money and effort into developing new drugs.

 

Now some apps will come with an “FDA approved” message

The FDA has made its final decision about which mobile health apps it will regulate. It is focusing on apps that could cause significant risk to users if the app does not function correctly. Apps that allow the user to check blood glucose levels or turn the phone into an ultrasound machine could be game changers for providers and patients. However, when I looked for these apps on the iTunes store, I couldn’t find any. Is this because they won’t be released until after the FDA approves them?

 

Egg Harbor dispensary is set to open

The long-awaited South Jersey medical marijuana dispensary run by the Compassionate Care Foundation is set to open in just a few weeks in Egg Harbor. Sales will be by appointment only and the building cannot have any illuminated signs, ostensibly to reduce the inevitable interest of recreational users. Interestingly, the non-profit Compassionate Care Foundation will have to pay federal income taxes because the federal government does not recognize its non-profit, leading to a projected cost to consumers of $400 per ounce, with a limit of two ounces per month. Could the rules and restrictions placed on the Egg Harbor dispensary be a model for regulating dangerous yet legal painkillers? We have a lot to learn from the state-by-state legalization of marijuana, and I’m interested to see how this evolves.

 

Adorable Care Act. That’s right. Adorable.

The Adorable Care Act has stolen my heart. These animals are just too damn cute. And they’re advocating for the Affordable Care Act on Tumblr and Twitter? Oh man, sign me up for insurance right now. Observe these baby animals that I poached right from the Tumblr:

This kitten is so excited she can stay on her parents' insurance for a few more years.

adorable_care_piglet

Friday Five: Creepy Uncle Sam and Generation Opportunity

This week, the fantastic Phoebe Jones sent me a link to troubling new anti-ACA ads. I got so riled up that this week’s Friday Five is all about Generation Opportunity. Take a look.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7cRsfW0Jv8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djCftQGTMC8

Of course, I jumped head first into the Generation Opportunity wormhole after seeing those two gems. And lovely readers, I saw some scary things down there. These are five of the more remarkable bits from their sites.

This is how insurance works! The healthy subsidize the sick—and the healthy tend to be young. Unless, of course, you’re insulated from the full cost of your premium because you’re one fortunate enough to be one of the less than 60% of Americans who get their insurance through their employer.

There is no Obamacare insurance. You cannot purchase something called “Obamacare.” We’re still going to dump money into the pockets of health insurance companies, only now they can’t screw us over quite so often. (Pardon my language—you should see my notes for this post.)

This has been debunked for a while now. I just don’t even know what to do with this other than say This Is Still Not True.

That’s all the page says. There’s honestly nothing else on it but the header and sidebar. I’m interested to know what Generation Opportunity means by this—will Obamacare judge quality, quantity, or some mix of both? Is there extra credit?

I would like more information about this important topic. But I sense that Generation Opportunity has a slight obsession with sex and yet can’t quite get their thoughts together about how to link what it loves (horizontal mambo) with what it hates (the Affordable Care Act) and that’s why this page is blank as well.

I’m highlighting the misinformation and combative headlines because we will be able to purchase insurance through the Marketplace (aka websites, phone calls, and paper applications) starting on October 1. This is a big day for the Affordable Care Act, and we will see all kinds of insane stories about how everything is going wrong. We have to remember that many of the reports will be blown out of proportion or just false…but some of the problems will be real. Things will be be rocky for a while. That’s what happens when you make big changes.

One final note: Just to be clear, you cannot purchase something called “Obamacare.” It simply doesn’t exist. If you have health insurance, it will be through Medicare, the VA or other federal programs, Medicaid, or private companies such as Aetna and Coventry. One more time: A plan called “Obamacare” does not exist.

Friday Five: Non-fatal illness, Medicare, gay blood donors, e-cigarettes, infographic

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Q: What’s the most prevalent form of non-fatal illness in the world? A: Mental illness and substance abuse disorders. That’s right—mental and emotional issues such as depression, anxiety, drug abuse, and schizophrenia account for 22.8% of all non-fatal illnesses. This isn’t just in the US, but across 187 countries and 30 years. It’s time to stop pretending these disorders don’t exist. The authors of the study presenting these findings say it best: In view of the magnitude of their contribution, improvement in population health is only possible if countries make the prevention and treatment of mental and substance use disorders a public health priority.

Doctors still take Medicare beneficiaries Rumor has it that in light of the Affordable Care Act’s changes to Medicare reimbursement, doctors are fleeing the system and leaving seniors without medical care. But a report from the Department of Health and Human Services showed that in 2012, 90.7% of doctors accepted new Medicare patients, compared to 87.9% in 2005. Furthermore, more doctors are accepting new Medicare patients than are accepting those with private insurance. If you have Medicare, nearly all doctors will accept you. ACA myth debunked.  

Banned4Life wants the FDA to allow gay blood donors Men who have sex with men cannot donate blood. The FDA reasons that because gay men comprise 2% of the US population but in 2010 accounted for 66% of all new HIV infections, and because HIV goes through an “undetectable” period just after initial infection, keeping gay men out of the donor pool maintains the safety of the blood supply. The newly formed Banned4Life group seeks to change this policy. Banned4Life is urging the FDA to consider sexual behaviors, rather than sexual preference or orientation, when deciding who cannot donate blood. Life-threatening illnesses, gay rights, and government regulations can rile up lots of people, and I hope the FDA looks carefully at its policy and is transparent about the decision it makes.  

E-Cigarettes are getting popular among teens Combining two of their favorite things, rebellion and new technology, teens are adopting the newest form of nicotine on the market, electronic cigarettes (or e-cigarettes). Nearly 10% of high schoolers have tried them, doubling the rate from 2011 and far exceeding the 6% of adult smokers who have given e-cigarettes a puff or two. This finding from the CDC raises some interesting questions: are e-cigarettes safer than regular ones? Are the anti-smoking campaigns aimed at teens intended to be anti-cigarette or anti-addiction? Hypothetically, if e-cigarettes carry no risk of disease, would it be okay for teens to use them? Will indoor smoking bans apply to e-cigarettes? These will be crucial questions to address as e-cigarettes gain popularity.

Just how imperfect is US health care, anyway? This colorful, informative, and slightly dizzying infographic from the MPH program at George Washington University shows us how not-so-well our health care stacks up to the rest of the world. Interesting points to consider:

  • 79% of Americans use some kind of contraceptive, one of the only times we’re mostly ahead of the pack, trailing only Russia, the UK, and Canada.
  • Ghana, Algeria, Mexico, and many more countries have higher measles vaccination rates among one year olds.
  • There is 1/3 of a general practitioner for every 1000 Americans, while there is just over two specialists for every 1000 people (87.5% of practicing doctors are specialists).

US vs World Infographic

Friday Five: heat, Bloomberg, Texas, heroin, ACA

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Let’s all do the heat wave! Just in case you’ve ignored the Facebook status updates, tweets, and complaints from co-workers, I want to inform you that it is Very Hot Outside. Growing up in Florida gives a person a skewed sense of the appropriate level of summertime heat and humidity, but this week has been tough even for me. In all seriousness, the heat is severe and dangerous, especially because so many people in the affected areas (map) don’t have air conditioning. So follow the heat advisory instructions: stay inside, run that AC (if you have it), drink water, and check in on seniors—they’re especially susceptible to high temperatures. And remember, we’ll all look back fondly this week while we wait for snow plows in January.

Bloomberg’s at it again But this time, he just wants New Yorkers to bypass the elevator and take the stairs instead. Mayor Bloomberg signed an executive order on Wednesday that requires all government building to be laid out using “Active Design” principles in order to promote physical activity like taking the stairs. We often talk in public health about making the healthy choice the easy choice and changing the built environment to encourage physical fitness. Bloomberg’s latest move may spark an interest in healthier buildings. Could Active Design be the new LEED certification?

You haven’t heard the whole story about Texas This was a big week for abortion controversy in Texas, and there’s already extensive coverage of what happened, so here’s some news you may have missed:

  •  You can now purchase Rick Perry voodoo dolls (cultural appropriation isn’t just for Miley Cyrus)
  • Texas Democrat Rep. Harold Dutton introduced a bill that would ban all abortion legislation until the state abolishes the death penalty.
  • The pink running shoes Wendy Davis wore during her filibuster have over 280 positive reviews on Amazon, and not all of them extol the arch support.

What did I miss?

Heroin’s popularity is growing in Northern New England In New Hampshire, the number of fatal heroin overdoses jumped from just seven in 2003 to a surprising 40 in 2012. The increase has also been observed in Vermont, with a 40% increase in heroin addiction treatment, and Maine, which had three times the heroin overdoses in 2012 as in 2011. There are a few factors that may contribute to this growing problem: increased control over prescription painkillers, the relative cheapness of heroin compared to painkillers, and because heroin can be sold at a higher price in rural areas than in urban centers, distributors are incentivized to sell more. Heroin is now taking up most of drug enforcement agents’ time in the area. Controlling infectious diseases like HIV and Hepatitis C will be the next challenge for the area’s public health community.

Curious about what’s happening next with the ACA? Kaiser Family Foundation released a new ACA video starring its charming YouToons. This one, a follow up to 2010’s “Health Reform Meets Main Street,” explains how to “Get Ready for Obamacare.” (Interesting, the change in terminology over three years!) This easy to understand breakdown of the complicated law is accessible to all audiences. Anyone talking to the public should be emulating this kind of clear communication. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZkk6ueZt-U

Friday Five: Chicago, ACA, firefighters, prescription drugs, vaccine recall

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

Fourth of July shootings in Chicago

This Fourth of July weekend is proving to be deadly for Chicago. Yesterday, eight people were killed and more than 30 were hurt in shootings across the city. The youngest victim is just five years old, and was shot while attending a party in a park with his family. These shootings are a disgrace, as is the lack of national coverage of the violence permeating Chicago. Victims’ stories should be plastered across every news station and website, and the nation should be reviving the post-Sandy Hook gun conversation in light of this inexcusable violence.

 

Another ACA delay

The Obama administration added to the confusion surrounding the Affordable Care Act by pushing the employer mandate deadline back one year to January 1, 2015. Another instance of caving to private sector demands means increased misunderstanding for the public. The law was incredibly complicated as written, and the administrative tweaks, House repeals, and flat-out lies disseminated by the media ensure that nobody has any idea what’s going on. The ACA is the single most important change to health care the US has seen since 1965, and its frustrating to watch it falter. Hopefully, the exchanges will still open as scheduled on October 1.

 

Firefighters killed in Arizona fires

Nineteen elite firefighters were killed on Sunday battling a blaze that is still only 45% contained. Their deaths have reminded us that the people suffering from these fires are not only those who lose their homes, but the people who are willing run into the flames to try to protect those homes. We’re learning about the hotshot teams specially trained to fight wildfires, an aspect of firefighting that was unknown to many people. I’ve been trying to imagine what it’s like to do what these teams do: go out to the fire, live near it for days, battling it while awake and smelling it while you sleep. I am in awe and very grateful.

 

More ‘scripts, more problems

This was a big week for news about prescription drugs. A brief rundown:

  • 70% of Americans take at least one prescription a day, mostly antibiotics, antidepressants, or painkillers
  • The number of fatal overdoses in women quadrupled between 1999 and 2010, and approximately 42 women die daily from overdoses
  • The FDA busted 1600 illegal online pharmacies

 

Hepatitis B Vaccine recall

Merck issued a recall this week for one lot of the Hepatitis B vaccine Recombivax. The issue is not with the vaccine itself, but with the glass vials that may easily crack. Merck is concerned about the sterility of the vaccine, and the FDA assures consumers there’s no need to be revaccinated if a doctor administered one of the recalled lot. The anti-vaccine websites I visited seem to have not picked this up yet, so maybe this vaccine news won’t be misconstrued. We can only hope.

In honor of yesterday's Fourth of July holiday, here's a little Katy Perry to get you dancing:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QGJuMBdaqIw

Friday Five: violence, HPV, obesity, smog, Obamacare

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Global rates of violence against women are alarmingly high

This week, the WHO released a study showing that more than 30% of women around the world have been victims of physical or sexual violence, particularly from their spouse or partner. The report also outlines the health issues associated with violence against women: death, depression, alcohol use, STIs, unwanted pregnancies and abortions, low birth weight babies. The WHO recommends that health care providers take violence more seriously. These findings remind us that violence is not a far away issue that impacts other people—all of the WHO regions have violence rates hovering between 23-38% (map). Whether we realize it or not, we all know women who have experienced violence against them, and we are all responsible for ensuring women have the education and mobility they need to keep themselves safe.

 

HPV rates are lower in teen girls thanks to vaccine

And now for some good news: the prevalence (number of cases currently in the population) of vaccine preventable HPV in teen girls has dropped 56% since the introduction of the vaccine. The ultimate goal is to have 80% of American children vaccinated in order to create herd immunity, meaning that enough people are vaccinated so the virus has nowhere to go. However, only about half of teen girls have gotten the necessary three doses of Gardasil or Cervarix. It’s time to stop stalling. Vaccinate kids and help prevent them from developing cervical, anal, or—as Michael Douglas reminded us—throat cancer.

 

AMA declares obesity a disease

The American Medical Association (AMA) voted this week to define obesity as a disease, identifying it as a complex issue that requires therapeutic medical treatment. They hope to reduce stigma and understand obesity to be a disease because it impairs some body functions. Critics denounced the decision, saying that because obesity is defined using BMI, it is not a precise diagnosis and that obesity has no specific symptoms of its own, only that it a contributing factor to other diseases. Although obesity is often characterized as a willpower and laziness issue, the resolution, as quoted in the New York Times, says:

The suggestion that obesity is not a disease but rather a consequence of a chosen lifestyle exemplified by overeating and/or inactivity is equivalent to suggesting that lung cancer is not a disease because it was brought about by individual choice to smoke cigarettes.

Hopefully, the AMA’s decision will lead to increased insurance reimbursement for obesity treatments, including nutritionists and gym memberships, as well as medical interventions and therapy.

 

Singapore is covered with smog

Fires in Indonesia are causing dangerous smog in the country and Singapore. Though no one has fessed up to starting the fires, they are likely due to illegal land clearing practices in Sumatra, which is west of Singapore. Today, Singapore’s Pollution Standards Index (PSI) hit 401, far higher than the “dangerous” level defined by a PSI of 300, and is considered “life-threatening” to the ill and elderly. Smog is a mixture of accumulated greenhouse gases and smoke, and is made worse by the combination of pollutants, sunlight, and heat that creates ozone. Smog causes serious respiratory, eye, and skin problems, and this smog is so thick visibility is seriously impaired.

 

Dems love the term “Obamacare,” Republicans don’t

The Kaiser Family Foundation June tracking poll shows that when referred to as “Obamacare,” 73% of Democrats responded favorably to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), as compared to 58% when the ACA was called “health reform law.” Republicans, however, saw an increase in unfavorable responses when the ACA was called “Obamacare,” from 76% to 86%. Apparently, the pejorative likely coined by none other than Mitt Romney has been successfully appropriated and turned into a rallying point for Democrats in support of the ACA. Obama is a linguistic master, and this shows he can turn even the most negative epithet into a compliment. Take that, Sarah Palin!

It's the first day of summer! This lion knows how to celebrate:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mV1CVTPVAJg

Friday Five: Sarah Murnaghan, Plan B, Arizona, wildfires, mindfulness

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. The triumph of Sarah Murnaghan

Follow up from two weeks ago: Sarah Murnaghan got new lungs! After a judge ruled that she must be added to the top of the adult transplant list, Sarah was matched with organs within days. The Murnaghan family will now step out of the public eye and, as Sarah’s mother says, they will be “focusing all of [their] attention on Sarah” as she recovers from surgery. Sarah is not the only one to benefit from her family’s perseverance—11 year old Javier Acosta was also added to the list. This judicial intervention will certainly inspire ethical debate about who can get which organs, and hopefully children’s lives will be valued as much as adults’.

 

Judge Korman: New hero of reproductive rights?

After the Obama administration finally dropped its appeal of Judge Edward Korman’s ruling that all products containing levonorgestrel be made available over the counter, the administration decided to make available only Plan B One Step (containing just one pill rather than two). Korman is not happy about this. Plan B One Step is manufactured by Teva, and if it is the only emergency contraceptive authorized to be sold over the counter, Teva will be able to set its price and have no competition. Korman argues this unduly burdens low-income women and that “it is the plaintiffs, rather than Teva, who are responsible for the outcome of this case, and it is they, and the women who benefited from their efforts, who deserve to be rewarded.” Korman also makes it clear that if the FDA or Teva drag their feet on getting Plan B One Step to the drugstore shelves, they should expect to be sued again.

 

Arizona finally decides to expand Medicaid

Despite her deep opposition to the Affordable Care Act, Governor Jan Brewer now accepts that the ACA is here to stay and that Arizona should get in on the billions of dollars available to the state. Her website even touts the Medicaid expansion as “the conservative choice for Arizona.” Imagine that: after realizing that “uninsured Arizonans get sick just like the rest of us” (because uninsured people are markedly different from the insured, of course) providing them with Medicaid would help reduce the rates paid by the insured! Brewer even denies the state is participating in “ObamaCare” by crediting former (Republican) Governor Fife Symington with coming up with the idea of the expansion in the 1990s. I’m pleased that 57,000 additional Arizonans will have access to Medicaid, but Brewer can obviously see the advantages of the expansion and yet spent months rabidly fighting the ACA…what a hypocrite.

 

Wildfires? Denver Post has us covered

Multiple wildfires in Colorado are causing serious problems for the state, and the Denver Post is taking care of business when it comes to covering the fires. It’s providing maps of the perimeters of each fire, the properties damaged, and a map of all fires across the country. There are chilling before-and-after photos of neighborhoods turned to ashes. The Denver Post is doing an excellent job of keeping people informed, spotlighting the firefighters, and reminding residents of preparedness procedures without being alarmist. With two people killed and hundreds of homes burned down, the fires are a significant natural disaster, and the Denver Post will keep us all informed.

 

Mindfulness classes in high school

Central Bucks High School East will add a new subject to its curriculum: mindfulness. Using techniques from Learning to BREATHE, the school hopes to teach students to regulate their emotions, manage stress, and strengthen their ability to focus. Central Bucks East hopes the mindfulness training will help high-achieving students feel less stressed about AP classes, applying for college, and taking the SAT while the training will also be taught in a program designed for students to learn how to live independently. Acknowledging that stress hurts students (whether they are in classes about healthy interpersonal relationships or European History) shows that Central Bucks East is trying to see its students as whole people. I’m eager to see this program evaluated—will mindfulness change test scores or graduation rates?

 

Start the weekend off right with the evolution of Daft Punk and Pharrell's new song Get Lucky as it would have sounded if it was made in the past.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3r3BOZ6QQtU