Friday Five: 9/11, tobacco in India, painkiller labels, Chobani recall, child abuse & neglect

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

9/11 responders are suffering from cancer

While we remember the 12th anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center, another attack is being waged upon the responders: cancer. So far, 1,140 people have been certified by NIOSH to have 9/11-related cancer. The types of cancer are varied—from non-melanoma skin cancer to non-Hodgkins lymphoma to colon cancer—and thankfully, the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund will cover all related medical and mental health expenses. However, an important deadline approaches: if a person knew of their related medical condition before October 2011, he or she must sign up with the Fund before October 3, 2013 in order to have their treatment covered. If you know anyone who may be eligible for this benefit, please (1) thank them for their selflessness and (2) tell them to sign up ASAP.

 

Tobacco + India = Bad News

Approximately 275 million people out of India’s 1.2 billion population use smokeless tobacco or cigarettes. According to a report from the International Tobacco Control Project, the country could see 1.5 million deaths annually if the number of tobacco users is not reduced by 2020. What’s even more alarming is that 94% of tobacco users surveyed said they had no plans to quit, despite government efforts to curb consumption and self-reported regret for beginning the habit. Citizens groups also advocate for tobacco-free living. This ad from Cancer Patients Aid Association is an example of the kinds of messaging Indians receive.

 

Source

 

New labels for some, but not all, narcotic painkillers

The FDA has announced updates to the labels for extended release narcotic painkillers to remove the idea that the painkillers should be prescribed for “moderate-to-severe pain.” Instead, opiates like OxyContin (oxycodone) and MS Contin (morphine sulfate) should be prescribed only when a patient’s pain cannot be controlled by other methods. These changes do not apply to fast-acting painkillers like Percocet (acetaminophen and oxycodone) or Vicodin (acetaminophen and hydrocodone) because the FDA sees that class of opioids to be less susceptible to abuse and overdose. Hopefully the new label will encourage doctors to think carefully about which painkillers they prescribe. The misuse of these drugs is out of control, and as doctors are the gatekeepers of prescriptions, their cooperation is essential to reducing addiction and unintentional deaths.

 

Chobani yogurt is moldy

Beloved and wildly popular Chobani brand Greek yogurt has been recalled. The problem of bloated, exploding containers is said to be due to contamination by the mold Mucor circinelloides. Although this kind of mold is not known to cause gastrointestinal problems, 89 people have reported nausea and vomiting after eating the recalled yogurt. That said, if your breakfast is fizzing through the lid, please don’t eat it. Let’s have some common sense, okay?

 

New child abuse and neglect report demands changes to the system

A report released this week from the Institute of Medicine described the fractured, underfunded, and unevaluated way the US researches and addresses child abuse and neglect. There are more than three million reports of abuse each year, involving at least six million children. The most common form of mistreatment is neglect, or when a caregiver fails to provide food, supervision, protection, medical care, education, or nurturing and affection. The full report gives a sense of how poorly the US manages child abuse and neglect, and this infographic also gives the basics. Children who are victims of abuse or neglect are far more likely to have serious health problems, including mental health issues, so eliminating violence against children should be at the forefront of public health efforts.

 

This week’s Friday Five is extra-depressing, so I’m going to leave you with a bonus uplifting story:

Wearing a sandwich board may help you find a kidney donor

Larry Swilling of South Carolina has been walking around wearing a sandwich board asking for a kidney donor for his wife Jimmie Sue. A complete stranger, a woman named Kelly Weaverling from Virginia Beach, decided to get tested and was found to be a match. The transplant happened on Wednesday and both Jimmie Sue and Kelly are doing well. Bonus: Larry’s efforts have led to 125 new registered kidney donors in South Carolina.

Friday Five: Chicago, ACA, firefighters, prescription drugs, vaccine recall

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

Fourth of July shootings in Chicago

This Fourth of July weekend is proving to be deadly for Chicago. Yesterday, eight people were killed and more than 30 were hurt in shootings across the city. The youngest victim is just five years old, and was shot while attending a party in a park with his family. These shootings are a disgrace, as is the lack of national coverage of the violence permeating Chicago. Victims’ stories should be plastered across every news station and website, and the nation should be reviving the post-Sandy Hook gun conversation in light of this inexcusable violence.

 

Another ACA delay

The Obama administration added to the confusion surrounding the Affordable Care Act by pushing the employer mandate deadline back one year to January 1, 2015. Another instance of caving to private sector demands means increased misunderstanding for the public. The law was incredibly complicated as written, and the administrative tweaks, House repeals, and flat-out lies disseminated by the media ensure that nobody has any idea what’s going on. The ACA is the single most important change to health care the US has seen since 1965, and its frustrating to watch it falter. Hopefully, the exchanges will still open as scheduled on October 1.

 

Firefighters killed in Arizona fires

Nineteen elite firefighters were killed on Sunday battling a blaze that is still only 45% contained. Their deaths have reminded us that the people suffering from these fires are not only those who lose their homes, but the people who are willing run into the flames to try to protect those homes. We’re learning about the hotshot teams specially trained to fight wildfires, an aspect of firefighting that was unknown to many people. I’ve been trying to imagine what it’s like to do what these teams do: go out to the fire, live near it for days, battling it while awake and smelling it while you sleep. I am in awe and very grateful.

 

More ‘scripts, more problems

This was a big week for news about prescription drugs. A brief rundown:

  • 70% of Americans take at least one prescription a day, mostly antibiotics, antidepressants, or painkillers
  • The number of fatal overdoses in women quadrupled between 1999 and 2010, and approximately 42 women die daily from overdoses
  • The FDA busted 1600 illegal online pharmacies

 

Hepatitis B Vaccine recall

Merck issued a recall this week for one lot of the Hepatitis B vaccine Recombivax. The issue is not with the vaccine itself, but with the glass vials that may easily crack. Merck is concerned about the sterility of the vaccine, and the FDA assures consumers there’s no need to be revaccinated if a doctor administered one of the recalled lot. The anti-vaccine websites I visited seem to have not picked this up yet, so maybe this vaccine news won’t be misconstrued. We can only hope.

In honor of yesterday's Fourth of July holiday, here's a little Katy Perry to get you dancing:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QGJuMBdaqIw