Teagan Goes Vegan

Or, Why a burger-loving lady is going to learn how to grill tempeh  

This will be my vegan bible.

I love food. I love cooking, I love eating, I love entertaining. I grew up around chefs and servers and sometimes made cookies in professional kitchens just for fun. In college, I majored in Religion and created a course just about Judaism and Food. Before I started my MPH, I worked as a catering cook and personal chef. Preparing and eating food has been, and likely will continue to be, an integral part of my happiness.

 

And I’ve always been a voracious meat eater. In elementary school, my mom would make chicken in lemon sauce and I would eat my whole plate before she even sat down. Burgers are my #1 favorite entrée to order in restaurants. Just last week, I declared that the only thing that would fix my bad mood was a Wawa meatball hoagie.

 

But morally, I’m evolving. As my college friends can attest, I had an awakening when I read Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma. After a brief corn obsession, I turned my attention to factory farms. I became vegetarian. I loved it—I felt like I was making a good choice not only for myself, but also for animals and the environment. However, I fell back into eating meat after a series of family crises, moving halfway across the country, and starting a new job. I was unstable in just about every way, and being vegetarian seemed like too much work.

 

Now, I feel solid. I’m about to graduate with my MPH and have a job lined up already. I’m getting married in September. I’m managing anxiety and learning healthy boundaries. I am strong, and now that I am strong, I want to be compassionate and responsible for my impact on the world.

 

Raising animals for food has significant public health implications. Infectious diseases like MRSA and influenza thrive in factory farms and are easily transmitted to humans. Antibiotics are used as prevention rather than treatment because the animals easily fall ill, and this indiscriminant use is the major contributor to antibiotic resistance. The massive amounts of waste produced in these Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) contaminate water, air, and soil.

 

The animals on factory farms are treated as commodities rather than living beings. A quick Google search will lead to graphic videos and images of slaughterhouses (euphemistically called “processing plants”) that will haunt you. The abuse inflicted upon these animals is outrageous.

vegan_farms

I had believed that ethically sourced meat was the best option for me, since I really like eating meat but have trouble with the ways in which it is produced. But alas, a student budget does not allow for pasture-raised steaks and farmer’s market eggs. I found myself eating way more meat than I wanted to be, and it was all from factory farms.

 

So I’ve decided to do an experiment. From yesterday, May 6, through June 3, I am going to eat a vegan diet. I plan to keep the blog updated about my experiences. Maybe I’ll throw in a recipe or two if I make something really tasty. I am tracking my food intake so I can share what I learn about balancing macronutrients and calorie consumption while eating vegan. I hope to have a series of guests on the podcast who can talk about the public health and ethical issues around this topic. The first episode, with Allyson Kramer, vegan and gluten free cookbook author, will be up tomorrow.

 

I hope you’ll come along on this adventure with me. It should be fun, it will probably be difficult, and it will hopefully be interesting.

Friday Five: Salmonella, abortion, bubonic plague, rabies, Tom Hanks

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

Government shutdown, Foster Farms, and drug-resistant Salmonella

Foster Farms—a chicken processor who was the source of a Salmonella outbreak earlier this year—has been implicated in selling meat that has sickened at least 278 people in 17 states. Although the processor insists the problem is due to consumers insufficiently cooking their chicken, they have decided to revamp their procedures rather than be shut down by the USDA. This particular outbreak consists of seven strains of Salmonella, four of which are drug resistant—and due to the government shutdown, the CDC cannot properly investigate the problem and may be missing information that could reduce illness or save lives. This is a perfect example of a useful government program that should be funded regardless of politics…salmonella doesn’t care if you vote red or blue.

 

Abortion news

There’s lots going on this week regarding abortion. A woman who will have to leave the country to terminate her pregnancy since she is carrying twins who have anencephaly is highlighting Northern Ireland’s total ban on abortion. Ohio passed a budget that included three abortion restrictions, and the ACLU is suing the state, claiming the rules have nothing to do with the budget and are unconstitutional. The Nebraska Supreme Court upheld a ruling stating a pregnant foster child was not mature enough to elect to have an abortion, so she must deliver the baby and place it for adoption. Arsonists have tried to attach the Planned Parenthood in Joplin, Missouri twice in one week. Finally, some good news: California expanded access for abortions by allowing nurse practitioners, physician’s assistants, and certified nurse-midwives to perform abortions.

 

Bubonic plague may be an issue for Madagascar

Unless Madagascar gets its rat population under control, it’s likely to face a bubonic plague epidemic starting this month. That’s right, the Black Death is endemic in the island nation. Rats abound in the main prison, and the concern is that if the bacteria is introduced to those rats, the fleas they carry will be able to spread bubonic plague to inmates, employees, and visitors. And you can’t just kill rats—you have to kill the fleas, too. No word on what’s being done to avert this potential disaster.

 

Rabies vaccines are way too pricey

Fewer than 10 people have been documented as surviving full-blown rabies, but if a person who has been bitten receives the rabies vaccine before serious symptoms develop, they are likely to survive. Rabies kills about 24,000 people, mostly children, annually across Africa (approximately 26,000 die in Asia). Rabies experts at a conference this week in Dakar, Senegal suggested the best preventive measure is to tie up dogs since the post-bite treatment is cost prohibitive to most people who are bitten in Africa. The treatment requires four or five injections that cost about $13 each. Seems to me that rabies vaccine manufacturers Sanofi Pasteur and Novartis should be striking a deal with someone to lower these costs and save a huge number of lives.

 

Tom Hanks has Type 2 diabetes

During an interview with Dave Letterman, America’s favorite actor Tom Hanks announced he has Type 2 diabetes due to years of uncontrolled high blood sugar. Hanks doesn’t blame his weight fluctuations for movie roles, but says, “I think it goes back to the lifestyle I’ve been leading since I was probably seven, not 36.”  He joins the ranks of Paula Deen, Randy Jackson, Billie Jean King, Patti LaBelle, Larry King, and 25.8 million Americans. Can you imagine if Paula Deen, Larry King, and Tom Hanks did a diabetes prevention campaign? That’d be TV ratings gold.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBhZoTN2bvM