Friday Five: Hajj, pinkwashing, listeria, IVF, President Taft

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

Hajj ends with no significant health scares

The Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca, called hajj, concludes today. Public health officials worried about the spread of MERS as well as the annual concerns of fires, stampedes, and the transmission of pathogens through the ritual of head shaving. Thankfully, there have been no injuries or deaths so far (though we’ll have to keep watch for MERS and the infectious diseases associated with the head shaving). The number of pilgrims was down significantly from 3.2 million last year to just under two million this year. Hopefully, this success can be emulated in future years—keeping people safe during religious rituals should be a priority for Saudi Arabia.

 

Just say no to pinkwashing

I don’t understand how someone thinks that purchasing pink M&Ms or water bottles or scarves does any more good than donating directly to a breast cancer research charity—and in fact, it doesn’t. Luckily, Breast Cancer Action runs a campaign every October called Think Before You Pink, encouraging consumers not to purchase these products. This year they’re targeting the known carcinogens that are in various “awareness” items. They’re pushing for legislation that would require chemicals in consumer products to be tested for safety before they come to market, something that is not required now. Take a look at what they’re proposing, and even if you don’t want to sign the petition, please consider sending a couple bucks to the American Cancer Society or another reputable charity rather than buying a pink iPhone case

 

Food recall: listeria edition

There is yet another food recall this week, this time with ready to eat chicken and ham products from Garden Fresh Foods tainted with listeria (the irony of company names involved in recalls always makes me giggle). Garden Fresh had a previous recall in September involving foods sold at Target, Weis, and other outlets. If you bought chicken or ham salad from Weis, and the package has "EST. 17256" or "Est. P-17256" printed on it, throw it away! Listeria usually causes trouble in the usual vulnerable groups: elderly adults, pregnant women, small children, and people with compromised immune systems. For the list of recalled foods, see the USDA.

 

IVF has been a huge success

Preliminary research shows that there have been at least five million births as a result of in vitro fertilization (IVF). IVF is the process of stimulating ovulation, retrieving eggs, fertilizing those eggs in a controlled environment, and transferring the resulting embryo into the woman’s uterus. People choose to use IVF for many reasons: maternal age, fallopian tube issues, male infertility, or to allow LGBT couples to have a child biologically related to a partner. Infertility is losing its stigma in no small part due to the surge in IVF babies. Having options about when and how to start a family is crucial, and being able to talk about those options and decisions helps normalize the ideas for others.

 

Former presidents…they’re just like us!

William Howard Taft, our portliest president, seems to have used the late 1800s version of Weight Watchers to slim down. New research shows that he had a years-long correspondence with a weight loss doctor who suggested a low-fat, low-calorie diet combined with exercise, portion control, and daily weigh-ins. Taft lost weight, but complained of constant hunger—no surprise because he was limited to small portions of meat, vegetables without butter, plain salad, and cooked fruit. He was not able to stick to the diet long term, so he eventually regained the weight he lost, much like modern dieters. Permanent weight loss is incredibly difficult, and Taft shows us that even the powerful can struggle with their weight.

 

Oh, and I’d love if you’d check out the first episode of my new podcast, Action Phase!

Friday Five: Salmonella, abortion, bubonic plague, rabies, Tom Hanks

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

Government shutdown, Foster Farms, and drug-resistant Salmonella

Foster Farms—a chicken processor who was the source of a Salmonella outbreak earlier this year—has been implicated in selling meat that has sickened at least 278 people in 17 states. Although the processor insists the problem is due to consumers insufficiently cooking their chicken, they have decided to revamp their procedures rather than be shut down by the USDA. This particular outbreak consists of seven strains of Salmonella, four of which are drug resistant—and due to the government shutdown, the CDC cannot properly investigate the problem and may be missing information that could reduce illness or save lives. This is a perfect example of a useful government program that should be funded regardless of politics…salmonella doesn’t care if you vote red or blue.

 

Abortion news

There’s lots going on this week regarding abortion. A woman who will have to leave the country to terminate her pregnancy since she is carrying twins who have anencephaly is highlighting Northern Ireland’s total ban on abortion. Ohio passed a budget that included three abortion restrictions, and the ACLU is suing the state, claiming the rules have nothing to do with the budget and are unconstitutional. The Nebraska Supreme Court upheld a ruling stating a pregnant foster child was not mature enough to elect to have an abortion, so she must deliver the baby and place it for adoption. Arsonists have tried to attach the Planned Parenthood in Joplin, Missouri twice in one week. Finally, some good news: California expanded access for abortions by allowing nurse practitioners, physician’s assistants, and certified nurse-midwives to perform abortions.

 

Bubonic plague may be an issue for Madagascar

Unless Madagascar gets its rat population under control, it’s likely to face a bubonic plague epidemic starting this month. That’s right, the Black Death is endemic in the island nation. Rats abound in the main prison, and the concern is that if the bacteria is introduced to those rats, the fleas they carry will be able to spread bubonic plague to inmates, employees, and visitors. And you can’t just kill rats—you have to kill the fleas, too. No word on what’s being done to avert this potential disaster.

 

Rabies vaccines are way too pricey

Fewer than 10 people have been documented as surviving full-blown rabies, but if a person who has been bitten receives the rabies vaccine before serious symptoms develop, they are likely to survive. Rabies kills about 24,000 people, mostly children, annually across Africa (approximately 26,000 die in Asia). Rabies experts at a conference this week in Dakar, Senegal suggested the best preventive measure is to tie up dogs since the post-bite treatment is cost prohibitive to most people who are bitten in Africa. The treatment requires four or five injections that cost about $13 each. Seems to me that rabies vaccine manufacturers Sanofi Pasteur and Novartis should be striking a deal with someone to lower these costs and save a huge number of lives.

 

Tom Hanks has Type 2 diabetes

During an interview with Dave Letterman, America’s favorite actor Tom Hanks announced he has Type 2 diabetes due to years of uncontrolled high blood sugar. Hanks doesn’t blame his weight fluctuations for movie roles, but says, “I think it goes back to the lifestyle I’ve been leading since I was probably seven, not 36.”  He joins the ranks of Paula Deen, Randy Jackson, Billie Jean King, Patti LaBelle, Larry King, and 25.8 million Americans. Can you imagine if Paula Deen, Larry King, and Tom Hanks did a diabetes prevention campaign? That’d be TV ratings gold.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBhZoTN2bvM

 

Friday Five: 9/11, tobacco in India, painkiller labels, Chobani recall, child abuse & neglect

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

9/11 responders are suffering from cancer

While we remember the 12th anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center, another attack is being waged upon the responders: cancer. So far, 1,140 people have been certified by NIOSH to have 9/11-related cancer. The types of cancer are varied—from non-melanoma skin cancer to non-Hodgkins lymphoma to colon cancer—and thankfully, the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund will cover all related medical and mental health expenses. However, an important deadline approaches: if a person knew of their related medical condition before October 2011, he or she must sign up with the Fund before October 3, 2013 in order to have their treatment covered. If you know anyone who may be eligible for this benefit, please (1) thank them for their selflessness and (2) tell them to sign up ASAP.

 

Tobacco + India = Bad News

Approximately 275 million people out of India’s 1.2 billion population use smokeless tobacco or cigarettes. According to a report from the International Tobacco Control Project, the country could see 1.5 million deaths annually if the number of tobacco users is not reduced by 2020. What’s even more alarming is that 94% of tobacco users surveyed said they had no plans to quit, despite government efforts to curb consumption and self-reported regret for beginning the habit. Citizens groups also advocate for tobacco-free living. This ad from Cancer Patients Aid Association is an example of the kinds of messaging Indians receive.

 

Source

 

New labels for some, but not all, narcotic painkillers

The FDA has announced updates to the labels for extended release narcotic painkillers to remove the idea that the painkillers should be prescribed for “moderate-to-severe pain.” Instead, opiates like OxyContin (oxycodone) and MS Contin (morphine sulfate) should be prescribed only when a patient’s pain cannot be controlled by other methods. These changes do not apply to fast-acting painkillers like Percocet (acetaminophen and oxycodone) or Vicodin (acetaminophen and hydrocodone) because the FDA sees that class of opioids to be less susceptible to abuse and overdose. Hopefully the new label will encourage doctors to think carefully about which painkillers they prescribe. The misuse of these drugs is out of control, and as doctors are the gatekeepers of prescriptions, their cooperation is essential to reducing addiction and unintentional deaths.

 

Chobani yogurt is moldy

Beloved and wildly popular Chobani brand Greek yogurt has been recalled. The problem of bloated, exploding containers is said to be due to contamination by the mold Mucor circinelloides. Although this kind of mold is not known to cause gastrointestinal problems, 89 people have reported nausea and vomiting after eating the recalled yogurt. That said, if your breakfast is fizzing through the lid, please don’t eat it. Let’s have some common sense, okay?

 

New child abuse and neglect report demands changes to the system

A report released this week from the Institute of Medicine described the fractured, underfunded, and unevaluated way the US researches and addresses child abuse and neglect. There are more than three million reports of abuse each year, involving at least six million children. The most common form of mistreatment is neglect, or when a caregiver fails to provide food, supervision, protection, medical care, education, or nurturing and affection. The full report gives a sense of how poorly the US manages child abuse and neglect, and this infographic also gives the basics. Children who are victims of abuse or neglect are far more likely to have serious health problems, including mental health issues, so eliminating violence against children should be at the forefront of public health efforts.

 

This week’s Friday Five is extra-depressing, so I’m going to leave you with a bonus uplifting story:

Wearing a sandwich board may help you find a kidney donor

Larry Swilling of South Carolina has been walking around wearing a sandwich board asking for a kidney donor for his wife Jimmie Sue. A complete stranger, a woman named Kelly Weaverling from Virginia Beach, decided to get tested and was found to be a match. The transplant happened on Wednesday and both Jimmie Sue and Kelly are doing well. Bonus: Larry’s efforts have led to 125 new registered kidney donors in South Carolina.