Friday Five: Veterans, birth, ACA, Politifact, #HealthPolicyValentines

It's back by popular demand! (Okay, maybe only Carmen asked if I was ever going to write another Friday Five, but she's so awesome that she counts as at least ten people.) Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Obama signs vet suicide prevention act Yesterday, President Obama signed the Clay Hunt Suicide Prevention for American Veterans Act, legislation aimed at improving the VA’s mental health care and removing barriers that prevent veterans from seeking treatment for mental health conditions. Death by suicide is particularly high among veterans over age 50. While their wish to end their lives may not be directly related to their service, the VA has a responsibility to care for veterans who qualify for VA care and are in need of it. The VA is notoriously problematic, and I hope that the newly-required external audits built into this Act will keep it accountable. After asking them to do what nearly every other American refuses to do, we continually fail our veterans--this Act is just a fraction of what they deserve.

Birth: Home versus hospital A short literature review by Dr. Rikki Lewis reveals interesting findings about the complexities and controversies surrounding home birth.

  • In the US, home births increased by 29% between 2004 and 2009.
  • Among studies investigating the risks and outcomes of home birth, there is little consistency in patient selection and the necessity of reporting infant deaths after transport to the hospital means that those deaths are reported as hospital deaths rather than deaths at home.
  • Policies for deciding to take a woman laboring at home are much clearer in the United Kingdom than in the US.
  • Home births are far less expensive than hospital births, which average about $20,000.

As the hospital versus home birth debate continues, it will be important to use correctly interpreted research as the basis for argument.

ACA open enrollment ends on Sunday The last day to sign up for insurance through the Marketplace is Sunday, February 15. According to the awesome website ACAsignups.net 10.5 million people have already signed up. Originally, the Department of Health and Human Services estimated that 13 million people would receive coverage during the open enrollment period, but later readjusted the estimate to between nine and ten million. If you need insurance and haven’t signed up, do it now...don’t procrastinate! (Also, can we take a moment to wonder why the “marketplace.gov” doesn’t redirect to healthcare.gov? Missed opportunity!)

 

Politifact takes on measles and vaccines One of the best, most useful sites ever, Politifact, evaluated the truthfulness of public statements about measles and vaccines. While their website could use a redesign to make articles like this one easier to read, the information they’ve provided is really valuable. They’re successful in debunking the “vaccines have mercury” claim and Rush Limbaugh’s accusation that Obama’s immigration policy allowed measles to enter the United States through Mexico. Politifact also highlights some of the true statements made by Megyn Kelly and other cable news pundits. While you’re reading their website, take a look at their ratings of statements about health care in general.

Health policy nerds love bad jokes Valentine’s Day isn’t only about romantic love. It can also be a time for you to express your deep, abiding passion for one of the nerdiest arms of public health: policy. Back in 2011, Emma Sandoe started the hashtag #HealthPolicyValentines so we could enjoy gems such as:

and

Groan worthy? Maybe, but totally great anyway.

Have an awesome Friday. I'll be back here tomorrow with a Valentine's Day-themed post!

Awesome Infographic: Child Injury

This week's Awesome Infographic comes to us courtesy of CDC.

Infographic from CDC about child injury

There are so many upsetting statistics in this infographic. I find the disparities between states fascinating. The states with the highest child mortality are fairly rural--Alaska, Montana, Wyoming, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina. The states with the lowest rates tend to be more urban--the Northeast corridor, the West Coast--with more rural states like Iowa and Minnesota and thrown into the mix. What are these states doing differently? Are the differences between the states a matter of the rates of life-threatening injuries or disparity in speed and access to medical care? While telemedicine has been rightly hailed as a groundbreaking innovation for improving rural health, it doesn't help much for emergency situations.

This CDC infographic is powerful. It takes complicated data and breaks it down visually so it is accessible to even the least data-inclined reader. It avoids cramming too much information and visual stimulation into one graphic, allowing the data be clearly explained by images and design. CDC does a great job with infographics--check them out!

Friday Five: Merck for Mothers, Gates Foundation, mental health, antibiotics, housing

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Merck for Mothers expands to the US

The US’s high infant mortality rate is often cited as an indicator of our nation’s poor health. However, the maternal mortality rate is often ignored while the number of pregnancy-related deaths has doubled since 1990. Pharmaceutical giant Merck established its Merck for Mothers overseas to help reduce maternal mortality and has just announced it will import those programs to work with expectant mothers in the US. It will provide $6 million in funding for initiatives in ten states and three cities, including Baltimore and Philadelphia. The project will also work to standardize procedures for pregnancy-related emergencies.

Maternal mortality by GDP per capita. I've highlighted a few countries for comparison. While the US does have a comparatively low maternal mortality rate, it is far above other countries with similar GDPs. The size of the circles represent the size of the population, and the color indicates the geographic region. Source: Gapminder

 

The Gates Foundation funds all kinds of new public health ideas

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is dedicated to improving public health around the world, and its Grand Challenges Explorations is a way to promote innovation. This week, the Foundation announced the 81 winners of this year’s $100,000 grants. All of the grants awarded fall into these categories:

  • Increasing the interoperability of good data (ex: improving humanitarian information management in crises)
  • Develop the next generation of condom (ex: condom applicator that can minimize interruption)
  • Labor saving innovations for women smallholder farmers (ex: participatory reality TV show encouraging the use of draught animals)
  • New approaches for the detection and treatment of selected neglected tropical diseases (ex: artificial snail decoy to confuse a parasite)
  • The ‘One Health’ concept: bringing together human and animal health for new solutions (ex: new canine rabies vaccine)

Non-specialist health care workers in developing nations are successful at mental health care

A report published this week shows good news for mental health in low- and mid-income countries. Examining 38 studies, researchers found that non-specialists (such as doctors and nurses rather than psychologists and psychiatrists), who have some mental health training, have been successful in alleviating mental, neurological, and substance abuse issues. Compared to untrained health care workers, patients of trained workers had a positive affect on depression, youth PTSD, and problem drinkers. The researchers caution against making assumptions about what kinds of interventions might work. But the bright side is that training primary care workers to consider mental health needs could help get much-needed care to people who may otherwise go without. You can read the report—and a plain language summary—here.

Tonight’s nightmare is…bacteria that no antibiotic can kill

New Zealander Brian Pool died in July, but the specifics of his death were just reported this week. While in teaching in Vietnam, he underwent surgery and contracted KPC-Oxa 48, a strain of bacteria that is resistant to all antibiotics. That’s right, all of them. New Zealand authorities were strict about quarantine, so there’s little worry that the bug will spread from this particular incident. If you’d like to learn about all the things at risk if we lose the ability to kill bacteria, Maryn McKenna has a terrifying run down.

Why we need public housing

I’ve recently become interested in the importance of safe, stable, and affordable housing as a prerequisite for good health. Ensuring everyone has their basic needs met is perhaps the most important public health issue. How can anyone expect to have a successful smoking cessation intervention if participants don’t know where they’ll sleep tonight? Now that I’m paying attention to the issue, I’m seeing it everywhere. This infographic explains how public housing can be a part of the solution.

public_housing_info

Friday Five: Cigarettes, taxes, cancelled insurance, krokodil, pre-term births

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. This time, it's Bloomberg-heavy!  

New Yorkers have to be 21 to buy cigarettes

In what may be his last public health move before leaving office, New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg is set to sign a bill that will raise the purchasing age of nicotine products to 21. The bill covers cigarettes, e-cigarettes, cigars, and cigarillos. About 90% of adult smokers become smokers before age 20, so I understand the public health rationale. However, I question whether it is ethical to make a product illegal for some adults to purchase based simply on the person’s age. The fallout from this soon-to-be law will help frame tobacco laws around the country, and I’m eager to see what happens next.

 

Mexico creates a junk food tax

Mexico has one of the highest rates of overweight and obese citizens—higher than even the United States. This week, the Mexican Congress approved a bill adding an 8% tax to all “high-calorie” foods like potato chips and sweets and a one peso/liter (about $0.08) tax to all soft drinks. The tax initiative was funded in part by Michael Bloomberg’s foundation. It is resolutely opposed by Femsa, the Mexican manufacturer and distributor of Coca-Cola, and Bimbo, which owns Sara Lee, Entenmann’s, and other processed food companies. Hopefully, when the costs inevitably are passed along to consumers, consumption of these items will fall and the population move toward a healthier weight.

 

Some health insurance plans have been cancelled due to the ACA

Before the implementation of the ACA, about 5% of Americans purchased health insurance individually. Many of these plans are now being cancelled because they do not fit the requirements all plans must meet under the new law. There’s lots of outrage, particularly at President Obama, because people feel misled. It’s pretty clear what’s happening: there’s a combination of insurance companies ended “grandfathered” plans early (which is their decision, not mandated by the ACA) and plans being cancelled because they were purchased after the “grandfathering” date and therefore are not legal. For an excellent flowchart showing how and why this is happening, Jon Lovett made an intricate one.

 

Pre-term birth rates fall again

The US pre-term birth rate fell to a 15 year low of 11.5%, or 1 in 9, in 2012. Although we still have the worst pre-term birth rate of all the industrialized nations, this is a positive development. This is the sixth year in which the rates declined, but the reasons why are not clear. Pre-term, low birth weight, and very low birth weight babies can have developmental delays, need more care, and cost more—on average, about $51,600. For more detailed information, see the March of Dimes 2013 Premature Birth Report Card.

 

Appearance of krokodil may be a false alarm in the US

(Warning: DO NOT Google image search for krokodil. Trust me.)

A month or two ago, the internet was abuzz with reports of people losing body parts to a new drug, krokodil. This homemade heroin substitute popular in rural Russia causes horrible sores that lead to severe disfigurement. A few cases popped up in a number of states earlier this year, but now the DEA suggests these were heroin use-related problems, like staph or MRSA infections at the users’ injection sites. Compounding the skepticism is the fact that in some places, a dose of heroin costs only $5 (!!!), virtually eliminating the need for even the most desperate user to knowingly inject his or herself with krokodil. Here’s to hoping that it really hasn’t shown up here, and that this interest we now have leads to getting actual krokodil users help.

Friday Five: Lea-Ann Ellison, antibiotic resistance, apps, medical marijuana, adorableness

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

Surprise! Lifting weights while pregnant is controversial

Americans do a great job of finding reasons to criticize women, especially when it comes to reproduction and motherhood. This week, we were subjected to a wave of judgment about Lea-Ann Ellison, who has the audacity to lift weights while 33 weeks pregnant. She says her doctor is fine with her exercise. Pregnant women are told to continue being active, and that’s exactly what she’s doing. If her doctor—not the ones quoted by media outlets—deem her exercise intensity level safe, then we should butt out.

 

Antibiotic resistance is going to be a big problem

A first-of-its-kind report from the CDC on the status of antibiotic resistance classifies 18 microorganisms as “urgent,” “serious,” or “concerning” in their ability to fight antibiotics. The list includes everyone’s favorite infections: gonorrhea, typhoid, and tuberculosis. Antibiotics are one of the most important reasons our life expectancy has grown, and losing the ability to kill bacteria will certainly mean more severe illness. This is a great opportunity for primary prevention (preventing illness before it starts); strategies such as advocating for condom use, safe food handling practices, and vaccines will be necessary. Meanwhile, doctors should be discerning about prescribing antibiotics, and we must invest more money and effort into developing new drugs.

 

Now some apps will come with an “FDA approved” message

The FDA has made its final decision about which mobile health apps it will regulate. It is focusing on apps that could cause significant risk to users if the app does not function correctly. Apps that allow the user to check blood glucose levels or turn the phone into an ultrasound machine could be game changers for providers and patients. However, when I looked for these apps on the iTunes store, I couldn’t find any. Is this because they won’t be released until after the FDA approves them?

 

Egg Harbor dispensary is set to open

The long-awaited South Jersey medical marijuana dispensary run by the Compassionate Care Foundation is set to open in just a few weeks in Egg Harbor. Sales will be by appointment only and the building cannot have any illuminated signs, ostensibly to reduce the inevitable interest of recreational users. Interestingly, the non-profit Compassionate Care Foundation will have to pay federal income taxes because the federal government does not recognize its non-profit, leading to a projected cost to consumers of $400 per ounce, with a limit of two ounces per month. Could the rules and restrictions placed on the Egg Harbor dispensary be a model for regulating dangerous yet legal painkillers? We have a lot to learn from the state-by-state legalization of marijuana, and I’m interested to see how this evolves.

 

Adorable Care Act. That’s right. Adorable.

The Adorable Care Act has stolen my heart. These animals are just too damn cute. And they’re advocating for the Affordable Care Act on Tumblr and Twitter? Oh man, sign me up for insurance right now. Observe these baby animals that I poached right from the Tumblr:

This kitten is so excited she can stay on her parents' insurance for a few more years.

adorable_care_piglet

Friday Five: sterilization, pain robot, brains, surgeons, Sharknado

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Rural women are more likely to be sterilized

Tubal ligation, also known as sterilization or “getting your tubes tied,” is far more common among rural women as compared to urban women. Of rural women, 23% said they had been sterilized; urban women, 13%. There is only speculation about why this difference exists. Some of the theories floating around are: less access to other forms of birth control; piggybacking tubal ligation onto post-partum Medicaid coverage; lower educational level. Importantly, 39% of those rural women regret their decision. We should be asking why they didn’t choose a long-term, reversible birth control such as an IUD or an implant (like Implanon) instead.

Somewhat cute robot helps reduce kids’ pain and suffering during injections

As a needle phobic myself, I was very excited to learn that there’s an innovation in helping kids’ distress during shots. The robot not only talks to the child in order to distract him or her from the scary needle, but encourages exhalation during the injection to help with muscle relaxation (video here). There are two reasons why reducing pain and anxiety for children receiving immunizations is important: excessive worry can make other parts of the exam difficult, and in the future, an adult who had a bad medical experience as a child may be more likely to avoid care. These both have significant health implications. If this robot can help, I say let’s get one in every pediatrician’s office—and maybe in internist’s offices too, for ‘fraidy cats like me.

Brain pathways involved with learning and changing behavior charted

This week the NIH published a study identifying neural pathways associated with learning and changing behavior in mice. The nerves associated with the switch from moderate to compulsive drinking were found to also have a role in learning and decision making. Researchers hope that their insights will be helpful in understanding alcoholism and addiction. Learning more about why some people can use substances in moderation while others become addicted is crucial to improving mental and physical health. Hopefully, these findings will also apply for humans.

Surgery residents operate less often under new rules

Medical residents (doctors who are done with medical school and are completing their practical training) work notoriously long shifts and even longer workweeks. Restrictions created in 2011 limited shifts to 16 hours for first-year residents and 28 hours for the more advanced doctors and everyone’s week is limited to 80 hours. Surgical residents have in turn participated in fewer hours of surgery because of the limits on working hours. Many doctors are concerned that this will put the budding surgeons at risk for not gaining enough experience. There has to be a balance between allowing doctors to get enough rest while also learning enough to practice on one’s own—the question is, how

Kathleen Sebelius may in fact have a sense of humor

Twitter blew up last night with references to Sharknado, a horribly wonderful movie about a tornado that blew sharks into a city. (I don’t know how that works, I didn’t watch it!) Buzzfeed immediately wrote an article claiming “There is no Obamacare coverage for pre-existing Sharknado injuries.” Kathleen Sebelius replied: https://twitter.com/Sebelius/status/355766513334108160 Hey, an ACA joke!

I leave you this weekend with an excellent infographic explaining pretty much everything you need to know about gender, sexual orientation, and the like…The Genderbread Person!

Genderbread-Person

Friday Five: violence, HPV, obesity, smog, Obamacare

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Global rates of violence against women are alarmingly high

This week, the WHO released a study showing that more than 30% of women around the world have been victims of physical or sexual violence, particularly from their spouse or partner. The report also outlines the health issues associated with violence against women: death, depression, alcohol use, STIs, unwanted pregnancies and abortions, low birth weight babies. The WHO recommends that health care providers take violence more seriously. These findings remind us that violence is not a far away issue that impacts other people—all of the WHO regions have violence rates hovering between 23-38% (map). Whether we realize it or not, we all know women who have experienced violence against them, and we are all responsible for ensuring women have the education and mobility they need to keep themselves safe.

 

HPV rates are lower in teen girls thanks to vaccine

And now for some good news: the prevalence (number of cases currently in the population) of vaccine preventable HPV in teen girls has dropped 56% since the introduction of the vaccine. The ultimate goal is to have 80% of American children vaccinated in order to create herd immunity, meaning that enough people are vaccinated so the virus has nowhere to go. However, only about half of teen girls have gotten the necessary three doses of Gardasil or Cervarix. It’s time to stop stalling. Vaccinate kids and help prevent them from developing cervical, anal, or—as Michael Douglas reminded us—throat cancer.

 

AMA declares obesity a disease

The American Medical Association (AMA) voted this week to define obesity as a disease, identifying it as a complex issue that requires therapeutic medical treatment. They hope to reduce stigma and understand obesity to be a disease because it impairs some body functions. Critics denounced the decision, saying that because obesity is defined using BMI, it is not a precise diagnosis and that obesity has no specific symptoms of its own, only that it a contributing factor to other diseases. Although obesity is often characterized as a willpower and laziness issue, the resolution, as quoted in the New York Times, says:

The suggestion that obesity is not a disease but rather a consequence of a chosen lifestyle exemplified by overeating and/or inactivity is equivalent to suggesting that lung cancer is not a disease because it was brought about by individual choice to smoke cigarettes.

Hopefully, the AMA’s decision will lead to increased insurance reimbursement for obesity treatments, including nutritionists and gym memberships, as well as medical interventions and therapy.

 

Singapore is covered with smog

Fires in Indonesia are causing dangerous smog in the country and Singapore. Though no one has fessed up to starting the fires, they are likely due to illegal land clearing practices in Sumatra, which is west of Singapore. Today, Singapore’s Pollution Standards Index (PSI) hit 401, far higher than the “dangerous” level defined by a PSI of 300, and is considered “life-threatening” to the ill and elderly. Smog is a mixture of accumulated greenhouse gases and smoke, and is made worse by the combination of pollutants, sunlight, and heat that creates ozone. Smog causes serious respiratory, eye, and skin problems, and this smog is so thick visibility is seriously impaired.

 

Dems love the term “Obamacare,” Republicans don’t

The Kaiser Family Foundation June tracking poll shows that when referred to as “Obamacare,” 73% of Democrats responded favorably to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), as compared to 58% when the ACA was called “health reform law.” Republicans, however, saw an increase in unfavorable responses when the ACA was called “Obamacare,” from 76% to 86%. Apparently, the pejorative likely coined by none other than Mitt Romney has been successfully appropriated and turned into a rallying point for Democrats in support of the ACA. Obama is a linguistic master, and this shows he can turn even the most negative epithet into a compliment. Take that, Sarah Palin!

It's the first day of summer! This lion knows how to celebrate:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mV1CVTPVAJg

The Friday Five: Angelina, E. coli, Tetanus, Cloning, Sodium

This is the first week of my new feature: The Friday Five! Each Friday, I’ll use fewer than five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Here we go! Angelina Jolie’s preventative double mastectomy

The lovely actor-turned-humanitarian published an op-ed explaining her decision to undergo a preventive double mastectomy (and probably an oophorectomy in the future). Angelina even allowed—encouraged? Demanded?—her doctor to publish her pre- and post-op treatment plan. The Internet unsurprisingly buzzes with commentary: some support her, some worry her privilege sets an unattainable standard of care, and some are concerned she lopped off two of her most attractive assets. I’m impressed with her openness. While most of us do our best to keep medical information offline, Angelina willingly shared hers, hoping her candor would help other women.

Swimming pools teem with E. Coli

A study conducted last summer in Atlanta area pools showed swimmers were cooling off in more than just water.  E. coli was found in 59% of the pools, and as the CDC says, E. coli is a “fecal indicator.” Uh oh, seems like we need a refresher course in pool hygiene. The CDC gives a good finger wagging, reminding us all to take a soapy shower before swimming and to avoid the pool altogether if we’ve been suffering from diarrhea. Pool staff also should remain vigilant about chemical levels and health departments must enforce regulations.

Newborn tetanus mortality declines dramatically thanks to UNICEF

When women give birth in less than ideal conditions, and non-sterile instruments are used during delivery and to cut the umbilical cord, both the mother and child are at risk of contracting Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus if the mother has not been vaccinated. In the early 1990s, tetanus was identified as one of the most common causes of death for infants. In response, UNICEF partnered with national governments, The Gates Foundation, and many others in order to vaccinate 118 million women. The problem has been eliminated in 31 countries, but the programs in 28 countries are still vulnerable to financial cuts and shifts in political support.

Human embryonic stem cells successfully cloned

Researchers at the Oregon Health and Science University implanted donated eggs with a baby’s skin cells and for the first time, the resulting embryos lived long enough that researchers were able to extract usable stem cells. This development inspires hope that we are on the path toward creating genetically matched replacement organs for those in need and treating patients with rare diseases of the mitochondria. However, the usual suspects (mostly Catholic leaders) have moral objections and call for the elimination of all stem cell research, even though researchers are not creating viable embryos. The promise of healthy lives for children and adults will outweigh these concerns. To paraphrase Jurassic Park: science will find a way.

Questions surface about healthy sodium levels

Federal healthy eating guidelines and the American Heart Association have long encouraged us to keep sodium consumption under 2,300 mg/day and under 1,500 mg/day for anyone who is over 51, African American, or has diabetes, heart, or kidney disease. A new report questions this claim. The link between sodium, blood pressure, and heart disease may be more tenuous than most of us thought. A low sodium diet may have unintended health consequences and may not, in fact, reduce risk of heart attack or stroke. This challenge to nutritional orthodoxy shows that investing in nutrition research is vital to population health and reducing illness and death linked to diet.

I leave you with the song that plays in my head every Friday at 6:00 pm. Have a great weekend!

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOfgVKVulQk]

The HIV Breakthrough, Prenatal Care, and Hope for the Future

On Sunday, news quickly spread that a young child in Mississippi had been cured of HIV. As a newborn, the child tested positive for HIV and the specialist, Dr. Hanna Gay, administered a high dosage of drugs within hours of the child’s birth. After continuing on antiretrovirals for about a year, the child and mother stopped treatment. When they resurfaced months later, the mother stated she had continued the child’s treatment. Surprisingly, the child’s HIV test came back negative. A series of increasingly sensitive tests showed the virus was undetectable. This discovery could overhaul the way mother-to-child (also known as perinatal) transmission is treated. If the results are reproducible, the drug dosage and combination has the potential to stop the 300,000 cases of HIV in newborns reported annually worldwide. What’s unique about this case is that the mother received no prenatal care prior to entering the hospital in labor. Generally, pregnant women with HIV require special treatment considerations in order to prevent mother-to-child transmission. Doctors and expectant mothers weigh the costs and benefits of continuing treatment, keeping in mind that transmission does not usually occur until late in pregnancy or during delivery. This mother and child enjoyed none of the protections of drug treatment until after the birth of the child—and yet they are the center of one of the most promising HIV breakthroughs.

About 25% of infants born to mothers who do not take AZT and other drugs during pregnancy will be infected with HIV. But if the mother undergoes treatment while pregnant, only 2% of newborns will be test positive. Now, with the possibility of mega doses of drugs after birth reducing infection rates even more, we may be working toward eliminating mother-to-child transmission altogether.

Prenatal care is crucial. But in Mississippi, where the child was born, the Kaiser Family Foundation reports that women of color who give birth in the state are far less likely to receive prenatal care until late in their pregnancy or until they go into labor.

Lack of care until late in pregnancy or lack of prenatal care altogether is highest in American Indian (27.8%) and black mothers (22.8%), followed by Hispanic (23.0%) and Asian mothers (14.1%). Compared to the 9.1% of white women who go without care until their child is close to full-term, the inequity is disheartening. And the numbers are not unique to Mississippi. These prenatal care patterns are consistent with the patterns of the country at large. Paired with the CDC’s findings that black women have the highest rate of mother-to-child infection (9.9 per 100,000 births), ethnic and racial disparities in prenatal care matter.

This possible turning point in treatment means that even if an expectant HIV-positive mother receives no prenatal care and gives birth to an HIV-positive child, the child may have a fighting chance to live HIV free. We know that ethnic and racial minority women do not receive prenatal care at the same rates as white women. This potential new treatment option gives hope that HIV-positive women who do not receive prenatal care—women who are disproportionately from ethnic and racial minority groups—may be able see their children live HIV-free.