Raw milk, cholera, and Appalachia: Cool stuff I read this week

I came across a bunch of interesting articles and bits of news this week, and I thought I’d share them with you. Spend your lazy Sunday catching up on current events. The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee released its recommendations this week. They encourage us to eat less sugar and saturated fat, but say we don’t really need to worry about our cholesterol intake.

There’s a new rapid test for Ebola.

Speaking of Ebola, Al Jazeera America ran a fascinating and discouraging two-part series on the social implications of the epidemic.

Although Haiti has improved its infrastructure in response to the epidemic, cholera is still a major problem in the country.

This interview with the Baltimore City health commissioner Dr. Leana Wen reminds us that public health isn’t just about Ebola and cholera and measles--it’s also about rat control and the social determinants of health. [Audio and abridged transcript.]

Flu season is starting to wind down.

The first broad study of two kinds of muscular dystrophy was published, revealing important epidemiological information about the disorders.

Despite some progress, Appalachia is still teeming with health disparities and poverty.

There’s a new tickborne virus in town.

For goodness’ sake, stop drinking raw milk. Pasteurization exists for a reason!

More than 25% of Americans with diabetes are undiagnosed. That’s 8.1 million diabetics who are not receiving treatment or making lifestyle changes.

Thank you, Alan Cumming, for using humor to highlight just how ridiculous the FDA’s new ruling restricting gay and bisexual men from donating blood unless they have been celibate for a year.

Alan Cumming Celibacy Challenge

 

Come back tomorrow for another Awesome Infographic!

"Eating clean" is dangerous to your health

Clean eating salad Since becoming vegan last spring, I have found myself immersed in the “clean eating” community. There is a natural tendency, when you are constantly reading labels to figure out if there’s whey hidden in that loaf of bread, to become a little fixated on the contents of your food. I’ve witnessed--and granted, this is all online as I’m not overwhelmed with an abundance of vegan friends--a shift from reasonably avoiding animal products to becoming obsessed with eliminating every potential source of non-vegan ingredients. Sometimes, this obsession morphs into not only following a hyper-strict vegan diet, but avoiding GMOs, non-organic foods, artificial sweeteners, or anything else that can be perceived as impure.

But vegans aren’t the only people who are susceptible to buying into the idea of “eating clean.” And yes, I will continue to use quotation marks around it because I think the term is, well, bullshit.

The creeping realization that the Standard American Diet (SAD) is a major contributor to our problems with obesity, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes means that Americans are becoming increasingly health-conscious. About 1 in 5 Americans are on a diet at any given time, many of whom may be motivated by vanity but certainly some want to become healthier. Americans privileged enough to have the choice have been turning away from convenience foods and choosing “cleaner” options. Even Wal-Mart sells organic items now that many Americans are convinced that GMOs are dangerous to consume (even though scientists believe they’re safe to eat).

This focus on purity is troubling. It’s easy to go from wanting to do what’s best for your body to severely restricting your diet to becoming obsessed with consuming only the “cleanest” foods. The very idea that some foods are “clean” implies that some foods are “unclean”--and we’re not talking about bacterial contamination or visible dirt. This devolution is called orthorexia--an unhealthy fixation on health which can be characterized by an obsessive desire to “eat clean.”

Because orthorexia isn’t an official mental illness, I haven’t been able to find any statistics about the number of people who suffer from it. What I have found is an abundance of examples of people who demonstrate behaviors that are in line with the symptoms of orthorexia. As a woman in her late twenties who is (1) working in public health, (2) vegan, and (3) a trained cook always searching for a great recipe, I stumble upon what looks like orthorexia all the time. Fitness bloggers, oil-free vegan YouTube stars, and fitspiration creators on Tumblr and Pinterest all espouse eating philosophies that focus on finding only the “cleanest” foods.

The obesity crisis exacerbates this issue. Particularly in public health circles, there is an emphasis on encouraging healthy diets and plenty of exercise as a way of curbing Americans’ collective weight gain. In fact, I began my MPH thinking I would become a nutrition and food educator (though my focus has shifted over time). Because obesity-related health conditions are a strain on quality of life and an economic burden, public health has rightfully invested resources in reducing obesity in our population. But the constant messages to “Make half your plate fruits and vegetables” can easily become, in the minds of those who are vulnerable to obsessive thinking, “The only way to eat clean is to only eat fruits and vegetables” or “Oil is evil.”

This is not to say that we shouldn’t be eating more produce. Absolutely, Americans should be. But I believe there’s a need to be sensitive to the diverse way healthy eating messages will be interpreted. The dangerous concept of “eating clean” is rampant and can have negative consequences for anyone concerned with achieving or maintaining health. Public health professionals should keep this in mind.

And if you’d like, I’m happy to make you some vegan chocolate chip cookies with real sugar, white flour, and lots of fat. I may not eat animal products, but that doesn’t mean I "eat clean."

The Conclusion of Teagan Goes Vegan

bananas  

So, the month of “Teagan Goes Vegan” has come to a close. In this episode, I talk about the experience: what I ate, what I missed, how my friends reacted. And I reveal whether I will be staying vegan or not!

Action Phase is on iTunes. Subscribe so you never miss an episode. Ratings help other people find the show and have the added benefit of giving me a little ego boost!

You can also stream the episode here.

[embed]https://ia902508.us.archive.org/6/items/28-TeaganGoesVeganConclusion-ActionPhasePodcast/28-TeaganGoesVeganConclusion-ActionPhasePodcast.mp3[/embed]

Teagan Goes Vegan Week 1: Eating Well, Making Decisions

I made it through the first week of Teagan Goes Vegan. I thought you may be interested in how things are going.  

So far, I haven’t had many food cravings, probably because I’ve been eating full meals and being sure to snack. During the first two days, I was really hungry, but I think I’ve rectified it by having bigger, more calorie-dense breakfasts than I’m accustomed to eating. I have been carrying around little packs of almonds, Larabars, and baby carrots just in case hunger strikes. Something tells me that if you look in any vegan’s backpack, you’ll find those same foods.

 

I’ve been tracking my food intake to be sure that I’m keeping a balanced diet and that I’m meeting my calorie needs. According to the USDA and DHHS Dietary Guidelines for adults:

  • 45% to 65% of calories eaten should come from carbohydrates.
  • 20% to 35% of calories eaten should come from fat.
  • 10% to 35% of calories eaten should come from protein

I’ve been aiming for staying in the middle of these percentages—50% from carbohydrates, 30% from fat, 20% from protein. So far, I’m doing pretty well hitting those goals. Here are two screen shots of my nutrition profile from Thursday, May 8.

vegan_calories_wk1 vegan_nutrition_wk1

I’ve also been taking a B vitamin supplement, since B12 is the one vitamin that cannot be found in plants, only in animal products. The other major supplements that vegans often take are calcium/vitamin D, iodine (usually through iodized salt), and iron. I’m not planning to supplement those at this point, though I'm following my intake closely and if I find I'm low on more days than not, I may start.

 

Grocery shopping has been an adventure. I started at Whole Foods, because I knew I could get lots of vegan products there. Though I’ve been a label reader for years now, I realized how closely I have to read them now. This meant I had to make some decisions about what I was going to avoid.

 

I chose to:

  • I am avoiding foods that may contain milk or eggs, even if there is no discernible milk or eggs in the ingredients list, but not avoid foods that have been processed in a facility that processes dairy or eggs.
  • I am not avoiding some of the additives that can be animal-derived, such as lecithins and monoglycerides.
  • I am not buying convenience foods just because they’re vegan. I didn’t eat chicken patties, frozen pizza, or breakfast sandwiches before I started this experiment, so I shouldn’t start now. I did buy some vegan soups in case of emergencies.
  • I will still consume non-vegan alcohol. For example, many brewers use isinglass, derived from fish swim bladders, to clarify beers. As my friends know, Nathan and I keep a well-stocked bar in our house, and a girl can only make so many changes in one month.
  • I will also consume processed sugar, even though some refined sugar is processed with bone char, though in general I try pretty hard not to eat too much added sugar.

 

This week has gone well. I’m eager to see how Week 2 shakes out. Want to know more? Ask me questions in the comments and I’ll be happy to share my experiences.

 

Action Phase Podcast Episode 25

allyson kramer headshotI kick off the first week of "Teagan Goes Vegan" with Allyson Kramer, vegan and gluten-free cookbook author and blogger. She talks with me about nasty blog comments about vegetable oil, the privilege inherent in deciding to be vegan, and how paleo diets are surprisingly similar to vegan ones.

Action Phase is on iTunes. Subscribe so you never miss an episode. Ratings help other people find the show and have the added benefit of giving me a little ego boost!

You can also stream the episode here.

https://ia902504.us.archive.org/7/items/25-AllysonKramer-ActionPhasePodcast/25-AllysonKramer-ActionPhasePodcast.mp3

Teagan Goes Vegan

Or, Why a burger-loving lady is going to learn how to grill tempeh  

This will be my vegan bible.

I love food. I love cooking, I love eating, I love entertaining. I grew up around chefs and servers and sometimes made cookies in professional kitchens just for fun. In college, I majored in Religion and created a course just about Judaism and Food. Before I started my MPH, I worked as a catering cook and personal chef. Preparing and eating food has been, and likely will continue to be, an integral part of my happiness.

 

And I’ve always been a voracious meat eater. In elementary school, my mom would make chicken in lemon sauce and I would eat my whole plate before she even sat down. Burgers are my #1 favorite entrée to order in restaurants. Just last week, I declared that the only thing that would fix my bad mood was a Wawa meatball hoagie.

 

But morally, I’m evolving. As my college friends can attest, I had an awakening when I read Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma. After a brief corn obsession, I turned my attention to factory farms. I became vegetarian. I loved it—I felt like I was making a good choice not only for myself, but also for animals and the environment. However, I fell back into eating meat after a series of family crises, moving halfway across the country, and starting a new job. I was unstable in just about every way, and being vegetarian seemed like too much work.

 

Now, I feel solid. I’m about to graduate with my MPH and have a job lined up already. I’m getting married in September. I’m managing anxiety and learning healthy boundaries. I am strong, and now that I am strong, I want to be compassionate and responsible for my impact on the world.

 

Raising animals for food has significant public health implications. Infectious diseases like MRSA and influenza thrive in factory farms and are easily transmitted to humans. Antibiotics are used as prevention rather than treatment because the animals easily fall ill, and this indiscriminant use is the major contributor to antibiotic resistance. The massive amounts of waste produced in these Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) contaminate water, air, and soil.

 

The animals on factory farms are treated as commodities rather than living beings. A quick Google search will lead to graphic videos and images of slaughterhouses (euphemistically called “processing plants”) that will haunt you. The abuse inflicted upon these animals is outrageous.

vegan_farms

I had believed that ethically sourced meat was the best option for me, since I really like eating meat but have trouble with the ways in which it is produced. But alas, a student budget does not allow for pasture-raised steaks and farmer’s market eggs. I found myself eating way more meat than I wanted to be, and it was all from factory farms.

 

So I’ve decided to do an experiment. From yesterday, May 6, through June 3, I am going to eat a vegan diet. I plan to keep the blog updated about my experiences. Maybe I’ll throw in a recipe or two if I make something really tasty. I am tracking my food intake so I can share what I learn about balancing macronutrients and calorie consumption while eating vegan. I hope to have a series of guests on the podcast who can talk about the public health and ethical issues around this topic. The first episode, with Allyson Kramer, vegan and gluten free cookbook author, will be up tomorrow.

 

I hope you’ll come along on this adventure with me. It should be fun, it will probably be difficult, and it will hopefully be interesting.

Friday Five: Marketplace, Olympians’ teeth, Wikipedia, sprinklers, McDonalds

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

The Health Insurance Marketplace is open for business

The day is finally here: the Health Insurance Marketplace is open! I’d hoped to poke around a little and report on what I saw, but the site is so busy I haven’t yet been able to get past this page:

alot_of_visitors

The fact that the site has been overloaded with visitors for the past four days shows us that we are ready to buy insurance and are on board with the Affordable Care Act. We’ll still have to work through some bugs, I’m sure, but I’m glad to see so many Americans are excited about this new option. Once I get past the waiting page, I’ll be sure to let you know how things work in the Marketplace.

Brush and floss twice a day…even you, Olympians!

According to a study just published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, athletes competing at the 2012 London Olympics who visited the athlete’s village dental clinic had surprisingly bad teeth. Of those people examined, 55% had cavities, 45% had lost some tooth enamel, 76% had gingivitis, and 15% had periodontitis. A full 40% of athletes were “bothered” by their oral health, and 18% admitted their dental problems caused issues with training and athletic performance. While we hold up these Olympians as paragons of health and fitness, their teeth tell us another story. Oral health is an indicator of overall health, and perhaps focusing intently on training is leading them to disregard other important aspects of their health.

Earn credit for editing Wikipedia at UCSF medical school

The medical school at University of California, San Fransisco (UCSF) is offering a unique course to its fourth year students: editing medical Wikipedia articles. They are working with Wikiproject Medicine to add citations and increase the accuracy of the 100 most popular medical articles on Wikipedia. Health care providers use Wikipedia often, and medical students have an abundance of information—so it makes sense for the students to contribute their knowledge for the good of site they’ll use frequently in their practice. UCSF is the first medical school to link Wikipedia’s education goals with course credit. Hopefully, the combined knowledge of the nation’s medical students can be used to help all of us understand the details of razor burn (the #1 most-viewed medical page).

Nursing homes need sprinklers

Medicare and Medicaid require all new nursing homes or additions to a nursing homes to have automatic sprinkler systems. Older nursing homes did not have any regulation regarding fire suppression or sprinklers until August 2008, and they were given five years to comply with the rule. Now that those five years have passed, approximately 1000 facilities have “partial” systems, and about 125 have no sprinklers at all. Considering nursing home residents often have mobility issues, an uncontrolled fire in one of the facilities would be devastating. If you know of a nursing home that does not have a proper sprinkler system, I suggest calling CARIE (I did my summer internship at CARIE; they’re wonderful) and talk with the ombudsmen there to help ensure the safety of the residents.

Happy Meals just got a little happier

This week, McDonalds announced major changes to its menus—value meals can now be accompanied by salad, fruit, or vegetable in lieu of fries, Happy Meals will no longer be promoted with soda but instead with milk, juice, or water, and advertising and packaging for children will encourage wellness and good nutrition. The changes will be made in McDonalds’ 20 major markets across the world, which comprise 85% of global sales. The most important part of these changes is the addition of choice. Adults and children alike will be able to choose salad instead of fries, water rather than soda. Having these choices available—and encouraged—will help fulfill the public health goal of making the healthy choice the easy choice.

Friday Five: withdrawal, Amanda Bynes, gluten-free labels, vaccine rates, urgentrx

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Pulling out is surprisingly popular

A study that will be published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology shows that 31% of women aged 15-24 used withdrawal as the primary form of contraceptive at least once. The study also found that 21% of those women became pregnant, compared to 13% of women who used other methods. I was pretty outraged to learn that so many young women rely on their partners to pull out, so I consulted the Kinsey Institute site Kinsey Confidential to compare different forms of contraceptives:

Method Typical Effectiveness Theoretical Effectiveness
Withdrawal 81% 94%
Male condoms 85% 98%
Oral contraceptives 92% 99.9%
Intrauterine Device (IUD) 99% 99%
Implant 99.01% 99.01%

Whelp, turns out the much-touted condoms don’t fare much better in preventing pregnancy than withdrawal, but IUDs and implants are far better. Advocating for more extensive use of IUDs and implants would help more women learn about their effectiveness and safety, and could play a major role in reducing the number of unplanned pregnancies. (FYI: condoms protect against some STIs, so keep using them, okay?)

Now we know what’s ailing Amanda Bynes

After publicly unraveling, actress Amanda Bynes has been placed on psychiatric hold and reportedly diagnosed with schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is a debilitating yet treatable disease that can lead to delusions, hallucinations (including hearing voices and smelling odors that don’t exist), and cognitive issues, among other symptoms. I sincerely hope that her family and doctors help her find the right treatment so she can find relief from her suffering. This story is playing out all over the gossip mills, and we can learn from this: erratic behavior requires intervention. In an open letter, her former co-star Nick Cannon also taught us an important lesson about how provide compassion:

So I say to my sister Amanda Bynes you’re not alone. I’m here for you. I understand. I care and I appreciate you, because that’s what family does and that’s what family is for. I also extend this to anyone else in my life, past or present that may find themselves in hard times. I’m here! Call me! Because I truly believe, the hand you’re helping up today may be the one you’re reaching for tomorrow.

Side note: take a look at this fantastic Atlantic article with Dr. Christine Montross titled “How well do we really understand mental illness?” for more insight into the hows and whys of treating severe mental illness.

Gluten-free labels, now with accuracy!

People with celiac disease, those with gluten sensitivity/intolerance, and dieters can all rejoice because this week, the FDA standardized the label “gluten-free.” The limit is 20 ppm, the lowest amount of gluten detectable in a food product. Foods such as fresh fruit and eggs can carry the label “gluten free” because they naturally contain no gluten. Regulations like this help consumers make informed choices. Considering more than two million Americans cannot digest gluten, having consistent, effective labels is the right thing to do for their health.

State-by-state vaccine rates tell us about exemptions

Each year, the CDC analyzes vaccine rates among the 50 states, Washington DC, five cities, and eight other US jurisdictions that receive federal funding for immunizations. This year, Mississippi topped the list, with 99.9% of kindergarteners receiving full doses of MMR, DTaP, and varicella (chicken pox). Overall, median exemption rate for the country was 1.8%; Oregon had the highest, with 6.5% of kindergarteners not meeting the vaccine standards. Interestingly, Mississippi does not allow religious or philosophical exemptions for immunizations. Removing religious and philosophical exemptions altogether wouldn’t be appropriate, but perhaps the success Mississippi has with getting children vaccinated will spark a conversation about strengthening the requirements for getting an exemption.

UrgentRx: alleviating upset stomachs, potentially saving lives

Forbes just published its list of what it deems the 25 most innovative consumer and retail brands of the year. An over-the-counter medication company, UrgentRx, made the cut. The company produces powders of common treatments for headaches, allergies, and digestive issues, along with plain aspirin intended for use during a heart attack. UrgentRx powders can be taken without water, meaning that you can give yourself a hit of heartburn medicines whenever you need it. The implication for potentially life-saving doses of aspirin are immense: a study in the American Journal of Cardiology, as reported by Harvard Medical School, showed that chewed aspirin worked faster against heart attacks than swallowing it whole or taking a liquid version. For a person with heart disease, carrying around a powdered dose eliminates the need to chew and provides the benefits of aspirin as quickly as possible.

Friday Five: Transplant ethics, Planned Parenthood, Hepatitis C, immigrants, Google

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Child in dire need of lung transplants starts a debate on ethics

Ten year old Sarah Murnaghan has been waiting for lung transplants for 18 months due to her cystic fibrosis and related lung failure. Doctors say she is not likely to live past the weekend without a transplant, so the severity of her illness placed her at the top of the pediatric list. However, Sarah is on very bottom of the adult list, meaning that any adults in need of lungs will be offered the organs before her, regardless of whether or not their need is as pressing as hers. Since 2005, organs are supposed to be distributed based on need, but that rule applies only to patients over age 12. Sarah’s parents have petitioned Kathleen Sebelius to change the rules to allow pediatric transplants of adult organs based not on age but on medical necessity. Hopefully, Sarah’s dire situation will ignite a conversation on organ donation and the ethics of treating children as if they are adults. (Okay, so this is six sentences but I think it’s worth it.)

Planned Parenthood case will not be heard by the Supreme Court

Indiana tried—and failed—to refuse Medicaid funding to Planned Parenthood. The Supreme Court refused to consider an appeal on behalf of the state to allow Indiana to withhold money from Planned Parenthood because it offers abortion services, even though federal law prohibits Medicaid dollars from being spent on abortion. Hopefully, this development will stall other attacks on low-income women’s right to choose their health care providers. However, the wily anti-choice movement is probably cooking up other ways to deny services to women—Indiana already has a law in place requiring facilities that offer non-surgical abortions to meet the same standards as facilities that perform surgical abortions. The Supreme Court’s choice not to hear the appeal is important, but as usual, fighting against restrictions on this legal medical procedure is a constant battle.

Is the “war on drugs” to blame for millions of Hepatitis C cases?

The Global Commission on Drug Policy called for an end on “the war on drugs,” in part because criminalization of injection drugs has lead to a quiet epidemic of Hepatitis C. The Commission estimates that of the 16 million injecting drug users (IDUs), 10 million are living with Hepatitis C; China, the Russian Federation, and the USA have the highest rates of Hepatitis C among IDUs. Arguing that harsh drug laws dissuade IDUs away from public health efforts such as needle exchanges, the Commission recommends reforming existing drug laws and focusing on health rather than incarceration and forced treatment. While I doubt many countries will decriminalize heroin and other injectable drugs, I’m pleased the Commission is drawing attention to the broader health concerns of IDUs. Regardless of drug use or dependence, a person has a right to access public health initiatives without fearing arrest and imprisonment.

Immigrants subsidize Medicare

A study published in June’s Health Affairs showed that in 2009 naturalized and non-citizen immigrants contributed $33 billion to the Medicare trust fund and received $19 billion in expenditures, creating a surplus of $14 billion. American-born citizens, on the other hand, contributed $192 billion and used $223 billion, creating a deficit of $31 billion. There are a few reasons why immigrants’ contributions lead to surplus: there are 6.5 working immigrants for every one retired immigrant and the cost of care for immigrants is less than the cost of care for the American-born. In a time when immigration and a path to citizenship are pressing issues, focusing on the positive contributions of new residents and citizens can only help decision makers to make choices to encourage new immigration. This study reminds us that immigration is crucial to the success and longevity of the United States, and treating all immigrants with respect and dignity is non-negotiable.

Google nutrition facts and get a clear answer

This coming week, Google is launching a new search feature: type a question about nutrition facts, and it provide you with a precise answer. The screen shots look much like the results when Googling conversions from cups to liters or the definition of a word. The feature is rolling out in the United States over the next ten days, but it shown up yet in Philadelphia so I haven’t been able to give it a try myself. Having the ability to ask direct questions about the nutrient content of food helps demystify some of the complicated information about healthy eating. This is health communication done right!

If you're looking to change up your workout routine this weekend, may I suggest Prancercise?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-50GjySwew

The Friday Five: Angelina, E. coli, Tetanus, Cloning, Sodium

This is the first week of my new feature: The Friday Five! Each Friday, I’ll use fewer than five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Here we go! Angelina Jolie’s preventative double mastectomy

The lovely actor-turned-humanitarian published an op-ed explaining her decision to undergo a preventive double mastectomy (and probably an oophorectomy in the future). Angelina even allowed—encouraged? Demanded?—her doctor to publish her pre- and post-op treatment plan. The Internet unsurprisingly buzzes with commentary: some support her, some worry her privilege sets an unattainable standard of care, and some are concerned she lopped off two of her most attractive assets. I’m impressed with her openness. While most of us do our best to keep medical information offline, Angelina willingly shared hers, hoping her candor would help other women.

Swimming pools teem with E. Coli

A study conducted last summer in Atlanta area pools showed swimmers were cooling off in more than just water.  E. coli was found in 59% of the pools, and as the CDC says, E. coli is a “fecal indicator.” Uh oh, seems like we need a refresher course in pool hygiene. The CDC gives a good finger wagging, reminding us all to take a soapy shower before swimming and to avoid the pool altogether if we’ve been suffering from diarrhea. Pool staff also should remain vigilant about chemical levels and health departments must enforce regulations.

Newborn tetanus mortality declines dramatically thanks to UNICEF

When women give birth in less than ideal conditions, and non-sterile instruments are used during delivery and to cut the umbilical cord, both the mother and child are at risk of contracting Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus if the mother has not been vaccinated. In the early 1990s, tetanus was identified as one of the most common causes of death for infants. In response, UNICEF partnered with national governments, The Gates Foundation, and many others in order to vaccinate 118 million women. The problem has been eliminated in 31 countries, but the programs in 28 countries are still vulnerable to financial cuts and shifts in political support.

Human embryonic stem cells successfully cloned

Researchers at the Oregon Health and Science University implanted donated eggs with a baby’s skin cells and for the first time, the resulting embryos lived long enough that researchers were able to extract usable stem cells. This development inspires hope that we are on the path toward creating genetically matched replacement organs for those in need and treating patients with rare diseases of the mitochondria. However, the usual suspects (mostly Catholic leaders) have moral objections and call for the elimination of all stem cell research, even though researchers are not creating viable embryos. The promise of healthy lives for children and adults will outweigh these concerns. To paraphrase Jurassic Park: science will find a way.

Questions surface about healthy sodium levels

Federal healthy eating guidelines and the American Heart Association have long encouraged us to keep sodium consumption under 2,300 mg/day and under 1,500 mg/day for anyone who is over 51, African American, or has diabetes, heart, or kidney disease. A new report questions this claim. The link between sodium, blood pressure, and heart disease may be more tenuous than most of us thought. A low sodium diet may have unintended health consequences and may not, in fact, reduce risk of heart attack or stroke. This challenge to nutritional orthodoxy shows that investing in nutrition research is vital to population health and reducing illness and death linked to diet.

I leave you with the song that plays in my head every Friday at 6:00 pm. Have a great weekend!

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOfgVKVulQk]