TissuGlu, measles, and herbs: Cool stuff I read this week

Source. I came across a bunch of interesting articles and bits of news this week, and I thought I’d share them with you. Spend your lazy Sunday catching up on current events.

  • A father asks a California school district to require unvaccinated children to stay home in hopes that his son, whose leukemia is in remission and who cannot be vaccinated, will not be exposed to measles.
  • The names, addresses, social security numbers, and other personal information for up to 80 million Anthem health insurance customers has been accessed by hackers.
  • Prader-Willi Syndrome, one of the only known genetic causes of obesity, causes significant health problems. This piece in the New York Times Magazine highlights Rachelle, a young woman seeking treatment for the syndrome.
  • The BBC published a series of maps illustrating the growth of the Ebola outbreak within Africa and the presence of Ebola on other continents.
  • It’s about time the Americans with Disabilities Act is applied to websites.
  • The FDA has approved a new internal tissue adhesive called TissuGlu (what a creepy name) for use in surgeries removing excess fat or skin and for repairing separated abdominal muscles.
  • Lots and lots of Chinese kids wear glasses.
  • In store-brand herbal supplements, 4 out of 5 contained fillers like powdered rice and asparagus rather than the herbs named on the packaging.

Read up!

Friday Five: Hajj, pinkwashing, listeria, IVF, President Taft

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

Hajj ends with no significant health scares

The Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca, called hajj, concludes today. Public health officials worried about the spread of MERS as well as the annual concerns of fires, stampedes, and the transmission of pathogens through the ritual of head shaving. Thankfully, there have been no injuries or deaths so far (though we’ll have to keep watch for MERS and the infectious diseases associated with the head shaving). The number of pilgrims was down significantly from 3.2 million last year to just under two million this year. Hopefully, this success can be emulated in future years—keeping people safe during religious rituals should be a priority for Saudi Arabia.

 

Just say no to pinkwashing

I don’t understand how someone thinks that purchasing pink M&Ms or water bottles or scarves does any more good than donating directly to a breast cancer research charity—and in fact, it doesn’t. Luckily, Breast Cancer Action runs a campaign every October called Think Before You Pink, encouraging consumers not to purchase these products. This year they’re targeting the known carcinogens that are in various “awareness” items. They’re pushing for legislation that would require chemicals in consumer products to be tested for safety before they come to market, something that is not required now. Take a look at what they’re proposing, and even if you don’t want to sign the petition, please consider sending a couple bucks to the American Cancer Society or another reputable charity rather than buying a pink iPhone case

 

Food recall: listeria edition

There is yet another food recall this week, this time with ready to eat chicken and ham products from Garden Fresh Foods tainted with listeria (the irony of company names involved in recalls always makes me giggle). Garden Fresh had a previous recall in September involving foods sold at Target, Weis, and other outlets. If you bought chicken or ham salad from Weis, and the package has "EST. 17256" or "Est. P-17256" printed on it, throw it away! Listeria usually causes trouble in the usual vulnerable groups: elderly adults, pregnant women, small children, and people with compromised immune systems. For the list of recalled foods, see the USDA.

 

IVF has been a huge success

Preliminary research shows that there have been at least five million births as a result of in vitro fertilization (IVF). IVF is the process of stimulating ovulation, retrieving eggs, fertilizing those eggs in a controlled environment, and transferring the resulting embryo into the woman’s uterus. People choose to use IVF for many reasons: maternal age, fallopian tube issues, male infertility, or to allow LGBT couples to have a child biologically related to a partner. Infertility is losing its stigma in no small part due to the surge in IVF babies. Having options about when and how to start a family is crucial, and being able to talk about those options and decisions helps normalize the ideas for others.

 

Former presidents…they’re just like us!

William Howard Taft, our portliest president, seems to have used the late 1800s version of Weight Watchers to slim down. New research shows that he had a years-long correspondence with a weight loss doctor who suggested a low-fat, low-calorie diet combined with exercise, portion control, and daily weigh-ins. Taft lost weight, but complained of constant hunger—no surprise because he was limited to small portions of meat, vegetables without butter, plain salad, and cooked fruit. He was not able to stick to the diet long term, so he eventually regained the weight he lost, much like modern dieters. Permanent weight loss is incredibly difficult, and Taft shows us that even the powerful can struggle with their weight.

 

Oh, and I’d love if you’d check out the first episode of my new podcast, Action Phase!

Friday Five: violence, HPV, obesity, smog, Obamacare

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Global rates of violence against women are alarmingly high

This week, the WHO released a study showing that more than 30% of women around the world have been victims of physical or sexual violence, particularly from their spouse or partner. The report also outlines the health issues associated with violence against women: death, depression, alcohol use, STIs, unwanted pregnancies and abortions, low birth weight babies. The WHO recommends that health care providers take violence more seriously. These findings remind us that violence is not a far away issue that impacts other people—all of the WHO regions have violence rates hovering between 23-38% (map). Whether we realize it or not, we all know women who have experienced violence against them, and we are all responsible for ensuring women have the education and mobility they need to keep themselves safe.

 

HPV rates are lower in teen girls thanks to vaccine

And now for some good news: the prevalence (number of cases currently in the population) of vaccine preventable HPV in teen girls has dropped 56% since the introduction of the vaccine. The ultimate goal is to have 80% of American children vaccinated in order to create herd immunity, meaning that enough people are vaccinated so the virus has nowhere to go. However, only about half of teen girls have gotten the necessary three doses of Gardasil or Cervarix. It’s time to stop stalling. Vaccinate kids and help prevent them from developing cervical, anal, or—as Michael Douglas reminded us—throat cancer.

 

AMA declares obesity a disease

The American Medical Association (AMA) voted this week to define obesity as a disease, identifying it as a complex issue that requires therapeutic medical treatment. They hope to reduce stigma and understand obesity to be a disease because it impairs some body functions. Critics denounced the decision, saying that because obesity is defined using BMI, it is not a precise diagnosis and that obesity has no specific symptoms of its own, only that it a contributing factor to other diseases. Although obesity is often characterized as a willpower and laziness issue, the resolution, as quoted in the New York Times, says:

The suggestion that obesity is not a disease but rather a consequence of a chosen lifestyle exemplified by overeating and/or inactivity is equivalent to suggesting that lung cancer is not a disease because it was brought about by individual choice to smoke cigarettes.

Hopefully, the AMA’s decision will lead to increased insurance reimbursement for obesity treatments, including nutritionists and gym memberships, as well as medical interventions and therapy.

 

Singapore is covered with smog

Fires in Indonesia are causing dangerous smog in the country and Singapore. Though no one has fessed up to starting the fires, they are likely due to illegal land clearing practices in Sumatra, which is west of Singapore. Today, Singapore’s Pollution Standards Index (PSI) hit 401, far higher than the “dangerous” level defined by a PSI of 300, and is considered “life-threatening” to the ill and elderly. Smog is a mixture of accumulated greenhouse gases and smoke, and is made worse by the combination of pollutants, sunlight, and heat that creates ozone. Smog causes serious respiratory, eye, and skin problems, and this smog is so thick visibility is seriously impaired.

 

Dems love the term “Obamacare,” Republicans don’t

The Kaiser Family Foundation June tracking poll shows that when referred to as “Obamacare,” 73% of Democrats responded favorably to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), as compared to 58% when the ACA was called “health reform law.” Republicans, however, saw an increase in unfavorable responses when the ACA was called “Obamacare,” from 76% to 86%. Apparently, the pejorative likely coined by none other than Mitt Romney has been successfully appropriated and turned into a rallying point for Democrats in support of the ACA. Obama is a linguistic master, and this shows he can turn even the most negative epithet into a compliment. Take that, Sarah Palin!

It's the first day of summer! This lion knows how to celebrate:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mV1CVTPVAJg