Friday Five: 9/11, tobacco in India, painkiller labels, Chobani recall, child abuse & neglect

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

9/11 responders are suffering from cancer

While we remember the 12th anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center, another attack is being waged upon the responders: cancer. So far, 1,140 people have been certified by NIOSH to have 9/11-related cancer. The types of cancer are varied—from non-melanoma skin cancer to non-Hodgkins lymphoma to colon cancer—and thankfully, the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund will cover all related medical and mental health expenses. However, an important deadline approaches: if a person knew of their related medical condition before October 2011, he or she must sign up with the Fund before October 3, 2013 in order to have their treatment covered. If you know anyone who may be eligible for this benefit, please (1) thank them for their selflessness and (2) tell them to sign up ASAP.

 

Tobacco + India = Bad News

Approximately 275 million people out of India’s 1.2 billion population use smokeless tobacco or cigarettes. According to a report from the International Tobacco Control Project, the country could see 1.5 million deaths annually if the number of tobacco users is not reduced by 2020. What’s even more alarming is that 94% of tobacco users surveyed said they had no plans to quit, despite government efforts to curb consumption and self-reported regret for beginning the habit. Citizens groups also advocate for tobacco-free living. This ad from Cancer Patients Aid Association is an example of the kinds of messaging Indians receive.

 

Source

 

New labels for some, but not all, narcotic painkillers

The FDA has announced updates to the labels for extended release narcotic painkillers to remove the idea that the painkillers should be prescribed for “moderate-to-severe pain.” Instead, opiates like OxyContin (oxycodone) and MS Contin (morphine sulfate) should be prescribed only when a patient’s pain cannot be controlled by other methods. These changes do not apply to fast-acting painkillers like Percocet (acetaminophen and oxycodone) or Vicodin (acetaminophen and hydrocodone) because the FDA sees that class of opioids to be less susceptible to abuse and overdose. Hopefully the new label will encourage doctors to think carefully about which painkillers they prescribe. The misuse of these drugs is out of control, and as doctors are the gatekeepers of prescriptions, their cooperation is essential to reducing addiction and unintentional deaths.

 

Chobani yogurt is moldy

Beloved and wildly popular Chobani brand Greek yogurt has been recalled. The problem of bloated, exploding containers is said to be due to contamination by the mold Mucor circinelloides. Although this kind of mold is not known to cause gastrointestinal problems, 89 people have reported nausea and vomiting after eating the recalled yogurt. That said, if your breakfast is fizzing through the lid, please don’t eat it. Let’s have some common sense, okay?

 

New child abuse and neglect report demands changes to the system

A report released this week from the Institute of Medicine described the fractured, underfunded, and unevaluated way the US researches and addresses child abuse and neglect. There are more than three million reports of abuse each year, involving at least six million children. The most common form of mistreatment is neglect, or when a caregiver fails to provide food, supervision, protection, medical care, education, or nurturing and affection. The full report gives a sense of how poorly the US manages child abuse and neglect, and this infographic also gives the basics. Children who are victims of abuse or neglect are far more likely to have serious health problems, including mental health issues, so eliminating violence against children should be at the forefront of public health efforts.

 

This week’s Friday Five is extra-depressing, so I’m going to leave you with a bonus uplifting story:

Wearing a sandwich board may help you find a kidney donor

Larry Swilling of South Carolina has been walking around wearing a sandwich board asking for a kidney donor for his wife Jimmie Sue. A complete stranger, a woman named Kelly Weaverling from Virginia Beach, decided to get tested and was found to be a match. The transplant happened on Wednesday and both Jimmie Sue and Kelly are doing well. Bonus: Larry’s efforts have led to 125 new registered kidney donors in South Carolina.

Friday Five: Sarah Murnaghan, Plan B, Arizona, wildfires, mindfulness

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. The triumph of Sarah Murnaghan

Follow up from two weeks ago: Sarah Murnaghan got new lungs! After a judge ruled that she must be added to the top of the adult transplant list, Sarah was matched with organs within days. The Murnaghan family will now step out of the public eye and, as Sarah’s mother says, they will be “focusing all of [their] attention on Sarah” as she recovers from surgery. Sarah is not the only one to benefit from her family’s perseverance—11 year old Javier Acosta was also added to the list. This judicial intervention will certainly inspire ethical debate about who can get which organs, and hopefully children’s lives will be valued as much as adults’.

 

Judge Korman: New hero of reproductive rights?

After the Obama administration finally dropped its appeal of Judge Edward Korman’s ruling that all products containing levonorgestrel be made available over the counter, the administration decided to make available only Plan B One Step (containing just one pill rather than two). Korman is not happy about this. Plan B One Step is manufactured by Teva, and if it is the only emergency contraceptive authorized to be sold over the counter, Teva will be able to set its price and have no competition. Korman argues this unduly burdens low-income women and that “it is the plaintiffs, rather than Teva, who are responsible for the outcome of this case, and it is they, and the women who benefited from their efforts, who deserve to be rewarded.” Korman also makes it clear that if the FDA or Teva drag their feet on getting Plan B One Step to the drugstore shelves, they should expect to be sued again.

 

Arizona finally decides to expand Medicaid

Despite her deep opposition to the Affordable Care Act, Governor Jan Brewer now accepts that the ACA is here to stay and that Arizona should get in on the billions of dollars available to the state. Her website even touts the Medicaid expansion as “the conservative choice for Arizona.” Imagine that: after realizing that “uninsured Arizonans get sick just like the rest of us” (because uninsured people are markedly different from the insured, of course) providing them with Medicaid would help reduce the rates paid by the insured! Brewer even denies the state is participating in “ObamaCare” by crediting former (Republican) Governor Fife Symington with coming up with the idea of the expansion in the 1990s. I’m pleased that 57,000 additional Arizonans will have access to Medicaid, but Brewer can obviously see the advantages of the expansion and yet spent months rabidly fighting the ACA…what a hypocrite.

 

Wildfires? Denver Post has us covered

Multiple wildfires in Colorado are causing serious problems for the state, and the Denver Post is taking care of business when it comes to covering the fires. It’s providing maps of the perimeters of each fire, the properties damaged, and a map of all fires across the country. There are chilling before-and-after photos of neighborhoods turned to ashes. The Denver Post is doing an excellent job of keeping people informed, spotlighting the firefighters, and reminding residents of preparedness procedures without being alarmist. With two people killed and hundreds of homes burned down, the fires are a significant natural disaster, and the Denver Post will keep us all informed.

 

Mindfulness classes in high school

Central Bucks High School East will add a new subject to its curriculum: mindfulness. Using techniques from Learning to BREATHE, the school hopes to teach students to regulate their emotions, manage stress, and strengthen their ability to focus. Central Bucks East hopes the mindfulness training will help high-achieving students feel less stressed about AP classes, applying for college, and taking the SAT while the training will also be taught in a program designed for students to learn how to live independently. Acknowledging that stress hurts students (whether they are in classes about healthy interpersonal relationships or European History) shows that Central Bucks East is trying to see its students as whole people. I’m eager to see this program evaluated—will mindfulness change test scores or graduation rates?

 

Start the weekend off right with the evolution of Daft Punk and Pharrell's new song Get Lucky as it would have sounded if it was made in the past.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3r3BOZ6QQtU

 

Friday Five: Transplant ethics, Planned Parenthood, Hepatitis C, immigrants, Google

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Child in dire need of lung transplants starts a debate on ethics

Ten year old Sarah Murnaghan has been waiting for lung transplants for 18 months due to her cystic fibrosis and related lung failure. Doctors say she is not likely to live past the weekend without a transplant, so the severity of her illness placed her at the top of the pediatric list. However, Sarah is on very bottom of the adult list, meaning that any adults in need of lungs will be offered the organs before her, regardless of whether or not their need is as pressing as hers. Since 2005, organs are supposed to be distributed based on need, but that rule applies only to patients over age 12. Sarah’s parents have petitioned Kathleen Sebelius to change the rules to allow pediatric transplants of adult organs based not on age but on medical necessity. Hopefully, Sarah’s dire situation will ignite a conversation on organ donation and the ethics of treating children as if they are adults. (Okay, so this is six sentences but I think it’s worth it.)

Planned Parenthood case will not be heard by the Supreme Court

Indiana tried—and failed—to refuse Medicaid funding to Planned Parenthood. The Supreme Court refused to consider an appeal on behalf of the state to allow Indiana to withhold money from Planned Parenthood because it offers abortion services, even though federal law prohibits Medicaid dollars from being spent on abortion. Hopefully, this development will stall other attacks on low-income women’s right to choose their health care providers. However, the wily anti-choice movement is probably cooking up other ways to deny services to women—Indiana already has a law in place requiring facilities that offer non-surgical abortions to meet the same standards as facilities that perform surgical abortions. The Supreme Court’s choice not to hear the appeal is important, but as usual, fighting against restrictions on this legal medical procedure is a constant battle.

Is the “war on drugs” to blame for millions of Hepatitis C cases?

The Global Commission on Drug Policy called for an end on “the war on drugs,” in part because criminalization of injection drugs has lead to a quiet epidemic of Hepatitis C. The Commission estimates that of the 16 million injecting drug users (IDUs), 10 million are living with Hepatitis C; China, the Russian Federation, and the USA have the highest rates of Hepatitis C among IDUs. Arguing that harsh drug laws dissuade IDUs away from public health efforts such as needle exchanges, the Commission recommends reforming existing drug laws and focusing on health rather than incarceration and forced treatment. While I doubt many countries will decriminalize heroin and other injectable drugs, I’m pleased the Commission is drawing attention to the broader health concerns of IDUs. Regardless of drug use or dependence, a person has a right to access public health initiatives without fearing arrest and imprisonment.

Immigrants subsidize Medicare

A study published in June’s Health Affairs showed that in 2009 naturalized and non-citizen immigrants contributed $33 billion to the Medicare trust fund and received $19 billion in expenditures, creating a surplus of $14 billion. American-born citizens, on the other hand, contributed $192 billion and used $223 billion, creating a deficit of $31 billion. There are a few reasons why immigrants’ contributions lead to surplus: there are 6.5 working immigrants for every one retired immigrant and the cost of care for immigrants is less than the cost of care for the American-born. In a time when immigration and a path to citizenship are pressing issues, focusing on the positive contributions of new residents and citizens can only help decision makers to make choices to encourage new immigration. This study reminds us that immigration is crucial to the success and longevity of the United States, and treating all immigrants with respect and dignity is non-negotiable.

Google nutrition facts and get a clear answer

This coming week, Google is launching a new search feature: type a question about nutrition facts, and it provide you with a precise answer. The screen shots look much like the results when Googling conversions from cups to liters or the definition of a word. The feature is rolling out in the United States over the next ten days, but it shown up yet in Philadelphia so I haven’t been able to give it a try myself. Having the ability to ask direct questions about the nutrient content of food helps demystify some of the complicated information about healthy eating. This is health communication done right!

If you're looking to change up your workout routine this weekend, may I suggest Prancercise?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-50GjySwew