Suicide prevention gets a new partner: Facebook

If you or anyone you know is having thoughts of self-harm, please reach out to organizations like the National Suicide Prevention Hotline or call their hotline directly at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). If you or someone you know is in immediate danger of self-harm, call 911 immediately. Your life is worth living and you don’t deserve to suffer.


Generally, my Facebook newsfeed is filled with silly photos of people waiting for the subway, declarations of love for a person’s partner, and snarky comments about current events. Sometimes, however, I see comments that make me concerned about someone’s mental health. I’ve been fortunate not to have seen anything that I felt needed to be reported, but I know that’s not the case for everyone.

Facebook announced yesterday that they are partnering with Forefront, Now Matters Now, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline, save.org, and other mental health organizations to create a more effective reporting program for people whose friends are expressing suicidal thoughts on Facebook.

When someone sees a friend's (let's call him Gerald) troubling post, they will have the option to report it directly to Facebook. Right now, at the upper right hand corner of every post, there’s a little downward arrow that, when you click on it, allows you to choose the option to report the post for potential suicidal content. (I haven’t been able to find screenshots of what that screen will look like, and the capability has not yet been activated on my account so I couldn’t make any of my own.)

The post will then be reviewed by “teams working around the world” to determine if the post does in fact imply that Gerald is in danger of self harming. If so, the next time Gerald logs into his account, he'll see this:

Facebook suicide prevention screen 1facebook_suicide_prevention_2facebook_suicide_prevention_3 Source: Huffington Post

One of the things that seems most promising is that Gerald doesn’t seem to have the option to dismiss these screens. He will have to at least click through the resources in order to get to their newsfeed. Hopefully, this will help reach some people who need help but aren’t able--for whatever reason--to ask for it or recieve it.

I also hope that Facebook is planning to critically evaluate this change. There are lots of unintended consequences that could arise from this new reporting system: a drop in posts containing potentially suicidal content, quick click-through speeds that imply users aren’t actually reading the resources, and gross misuse of the capability that floods the reviewing teams, making effective review difficult or impossible.

And when Facebook evaluates the initiative, I hope they make that information public. Because social media can provide a platform for mental health intervention, we need to know if a huge intervention like this is actually successful.

To learn more about this Facebook change, check out the Facebook Safety post explaining what’s happening.

Friday Five: Veterans, birth, ACA, Politifact, #HealthPolicyValentines

It's back by popular demand! (Okay, maybe only Carmen asked if I was ever going to write another Friday Five, but she's so awesome that she counts as at least ten people.) Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Obama signs vet suicide prevention act Yesterday, President Obama signed the Clay Hunt Suicide Prevention for American Veterans Act, legislation aimed at improving the VA’s mental health care and removing barriers that prevent veterans from seeking treatment for mental health conditions. Death by suicide is particularly high among veterans over age 50. While their wish to end their lives may not be directly related to their service, the VA has a responsibility to care for veterans who qualify for VA care and are in need of it. The VA is notoriously problematic, and I hope that the newly-required external audits built into this Act will keep it accountable. After asking them to do what nearly every other American refuses to do, we continually fail our veterans--this Act is just a fraction of what they deserve.

Birth: Home versus hospital A short literature review by Dr. Rikki Lewis reveals interesting findings about the complexities and controversies surrounding home birth.

  • In the US, home births increased by 29% between 2004 and 2009.
  • Among studies investigating the risks and outcomes of home birth, there is little consistency in patient selection and the necessity of reporting infant deaths after transport to the hospital means that those deaths are reported as hospital deaths rather than deaths at home.
  • Policies for deciding to take a woman laboring at home are much clearer in the United Kingdom than in the US.
  • Home births are far less expensive than hospital births, which average about $20,000.

As the hospital versus home birth debate continues, it will be important to use correctly interpreted research as the basis for argument.

ACA open enrollment ends on Sunday The last day to sign up for insurance through the Marketplace is Sunday, February 15. According to the awesome website ACAsignups.net 10.5 million people have already signed up. Originally, the Department of Health and Human Services estimated that 13 million people would receive coverage during the open enrollment period, but later readjusted the estimate to between nine and ten million. If you need insurance and haven’t signed up, do it now...don’t procrastinate! (Also, can we take a moment to wonder why the “marketplace.gov” doesn’t redirect to healthcare.gov? Missed opportunity!)

 

Politifact takes on measles and vaccines One of the best, most useful sites ever, Politifact, evaluated the truthfulness of public statements about measles and vaccines. While their website could use a redesign to make articles like this one easier to read, the information they’ve provided is really valuable. They’re successful in debunking the “vaccines have mercury” claim and Rush Limbaugh’s accusation that Obama’s immigration policy allowed measles to enter the United States through Mexico. Politifact also highlights some of the true statements made by Megyn Kelly and other cable news pundits. While you’re reading their website, take a look at their ratings of statements about health care in general.

Health policy nerds love bad jokes Valentine’s Day isn’t only about romantic love. It can also be a time for you to express your deep, abiding passion for one of the nerdiest arms of public health: policy. Back in 2011, Emma Sandoe started the hashtag #HealthPolicyValentines so we could enjoy gems such as:

and

Groan worthy? Maybe, but totally great anyway.

Have an awesome Friday. I'll be back here tomorrow with a Valentine's Day-themed post!

Friday Five: Lea-Ann Ellison, antibiotic resistance, apps, medical marijuana, adorableness

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

Surprise! Lifting weights while pregnant is controversial

Americans do a great job of finding reasons to criticize women, especially when it comes to reproduction and motherhood. This week, we were subjected to a wave of judgment about Lea-Ann Ellison, who has the audacity to lift weights while 33 weeks pregnant. She says her doctor is fine with her exercise. Pregnant women are told to continue being active, and that’s exactly what she’s doing. If her doctor—not the ones quoted by media outlets—deem her exercise intensity level safe, then we should butt out.

 

Antibiotic resistance is going to be a big problem

A first-of-its-kind report from the CDC on the status of antibiotic resistance classifies 18 microorganisms as “urgent,” “serious,” or “concerning” in their ability to fight antibiotics. The list includes everyone’s favorite infections: gonorrhea, typhoid, and tuberculosis. Antibiotics are one of the most important reasons our life expectancy has grown, and losing the ability to kill bacteria will certainly mean more severe illness. This is a great opportunity for primary prevention (preventing illness before it starts); strategies such as advocating for condom use, safe food handling practices, and vaccines will be necessary. Meanwhile, doctors should be discerning about prescribing antibiotics, and we must invest more money and effort into developing new drugs.

 

Now some apps will come with an “FDA approved” message

The FDA has made its final decision about which mobile health apps it will regulate. It is focusing on apps that could cause significant risk to users if the app does not function correctly. Apps that allow the user to check blood glucose levels or turn the phone into an ultrasound machine could be game changers for providers and patients. However, when I looked for these apps on the iTunes store, I couldn’t find any. Is this because they won’t be released until after the FDA approves them?

 

Egg Harbor dispensary is set to open

The long-awaited South Jersey medical marijuana dispensary run by the Compassionate Care Foundation is set to open in just a few weeks in Egg Harbor. Sales will be by appointment only and the building cannot have any illuminated signs, ostensibly to reduce the inevitable interest of recreational users. Interestingly, the non-profit Compassionate Care Foundation will have to pay federal income taxes because the federal government does not recognize its non-profit, leading to a projected cost to consumers of $400 per ounce, with a limit of two ounces per month. Could the rules and restrictions placed on the Egg Harbor dispensary be a model for regulating dangerous yet legal painkillers? We have a lot to learn from the state-by-state legalization of marijuana, and I’m interested to see how this evolves.

 

Adorable Care Act. That’s right. Adorable.

The Adorable Care Act has stolen my heart. These animals are just too damn cute. And they’re advocating for the Affordable Care Act on Tumblr and Twitter? Oh man, sign me up for insurance right now. Observe these baby animals that I poached right from the Tumblr:

This kitten is so excited she can stay on her parents' insurance for a few more years.

adorable_care_piglet

Health Communicators should be Podcasting!

I have the honor of co-organizing (with the wonderful Nathan Kuruna) the first ever Philadelphia Podcast Festival, happening August 1-3 at PhilaMOCA and PhillyCAM. As a talkative kind of gal, I’ve been doing a few interviews to promote the Festival. This means I’ve been thinking a lot about the power of independent media to give voice to anyone who wants to tell a story. And then it hit me: public health professionals should be podcasting. First, let’s define a podcast. From the Philadelphia Podcast Festival’s site:

A podcast is a bit like a radio show that you download from the internet. A lot of podcasters use them purely to entertain people but any business, organization or individual can use a podcast to share information. This keeps their fans, customers, members or friends updated on what they’re up to. You can use it to broadcast any message you want into the world. Audio is recorded, posted online and retrieved on demand by listeners. Some listen to podcasts at their computers, others put them on an mp3 player and listen to them while doing other things (jogging, driving, etc.).

Podcasters generally release new episodes on weekly or monthly basis. A listener can manually download each episode or subscribe to a podcast and have it automatically download to a computer or device as new episodes are released.

People really do listen to podcasts. As of 2011, there were 91,000 podcasts. In 2012, Edison Research found that 29% of Americans polled had listened to a podcast at least once, and 26% had viewed a video podcast (sometimes called a vodcast) at least once. This shows a shift from early adopters of the medium into a more general audience. Not to mention, iTunes just reached 1 billion subscriptions.

Since jumping into the public health world, I’ve learned that this field is learning to love social media. We’re learning how to use Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and the like for public health messaging. (Shout out to Jim Garrow’s social media for public health twitter chat #sm4ph for teaching me about all kinds of social media I never would have tried on my own!) However, there’s a steep learning curve for health departments and organizations to get used to making content specifically for networks like Vine or Pinterest. We're still learning how to increase the efficacy and reach of that content.

But podcasting is simple: just hit record and start talking. Public health communicators should be doing what they do best—communicating—by taking advantage of podcasting’s unique qualities:

  • Anyone can make a podcast.
  • Anyone can listen to a podcast.
  • Podcasts are portable so you don’t have to be in front of a screen to enjoy them.
  • People without home internet access can download episodes at the library or Keyspot, load it onto a smart phone or iPod and listen any time.
  • Sensitive issues like sexual health or mental illness are perfect topics for podcasts because listening to them is usually a private activity.
  • Podcast listeners often develop a relationship with podcasters through repeated exposure to their ideas and information. Regularly scheduling frequent episodes helps build trust between listener and podcaster, which is especially important for health topics.
  • Podcasts don’t have to be just informative. The medium does best with a casual tone and a steady infusion of humor and lightheartedness.

I poked around a little and found that there are some active public health podcasts. I made this handy chart of the ones I found that are still active (there are plenty of defunct podcasts—looking at you, WHO and EPA), so you can check them out. I deliberately excluded anything called a podcast simply made non-internet-based audio or video available online, such as NPR stories or recordings of lectures. There’s also a great listing of additional podcasts from academic journals at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Ebling Library.

 

Organization

Name

Latest Episode Topic

Sample Topics

Approximate Episode Length

American Public Health Association Get Ready Report July 11, 2013: Travel Safety Preparedness: hurricanes, flu, pets & disasters, healthy stockpiling 3-21 minutes
Centers for Disease Control

 

CDC Podcast July 17, 2013: Healthy Corner Store Initiative HPV vaccine, foodborne illness, zoonotic disease, history 1-20 minutes
Department of Health and Human Services HHS HealthBeat July 29, 2013: Kid Jitters and Emergencies Daily tips on asthma, preparedness, smoking, kidney stones 59 seconds
Helen Osborne Health Literacy Out Loud July 30, 2013: Stages of Change and Health Communication Poetry and health, communicating screening test results, jargon 15-25 minutes
Jigsaw PSPH I’m a Public Health Professional Get Me Out of Here! July 26, 2013: The royal baby Air quality, bogus health inspectors, local health departments 8-10 minutes
Johns Hopkins School of Public Health Public Health: On the Inside July 2013: The Consumer’s Scientist Flu, trauma, injury prevention 10-13 minutes
Harvard School of Public Health HSPH Podcast July 25, 2013: Breakfast and Heart Disease Risk Health disparities, history, new research, ACA 5-10 minutes
National Institutes of Health NIH Research Radio July 26, 2013: Evening chronotype and eating behavior Diabetes, heat safety, depression, hypnosis and sleep 15 minutes
Nina Martin Public Health United July 3, 2010: What does mosquito season mean for you? Interviews, BRCA genes, health communication 40 minutes-1 hour

I hope that as the field learns more about social and new media, we can start to embrace podcasting. Do you listen to podcasts? Have you considered starting one for public health or in another field? (If you are, be sure to come to our FREE panel discussion with podcasting experts on August 2 at 2pm at PhillyCAM.)

Find out more about the Philadelphia Podcast Festival by following us on Twitter and check us out on Facebook. You can also get the schedule of events and purchase tickets.

Friday Five: sterilization, pain robot, brains, surgeons, Sharknado

Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Rural women are more likely to be sterilized

Tubal ligation, also known as sterilization or “getting your tubes tied,” is far more common among rural women as compared to urban women. Of rural women, 23% said they had been sterilized; urban women, 13%. There is only speculation about why this difference exists. Some of the theories floating around are: less access to other forms of birth control; piggybacking tubal ligation onto post-partum Medicaid coverage; lower educational level. Importantly, 39% of those rural women regret their decision. We should be asking why they didn’t choose a long-term, reversible birth control such as an IUD or an implant (like Implanon) instead.

Somewhat cute robot helps reduce kids’ pain and suffering during injections

As a needle phobic myself, I was very excited to learn that there’s an innovation in helping kids’ distress during shots. The robot not only talks to the child in order to distract him or her from the scary needle, but encourages exhalation during the injection to help with muscle relaxation (video here). There are two reasons why reducing pain and anxiety for children receiving immunizations is important: excessive worry can make other parts of the exam difficult, and in the future, an adult who had a bad medical experience as a child may be more likely to avoid care. These both have significant health implications. If this robot can help, I say let’s get one in every pediatrician’s office—and maybe in internist’s offices too, for ‘fraidy cats like me.

Brain pathways involved with learning and changing behavior charted

This week the NIH published a study identifying neural pathways associated with learning and changing behavior in mice. The nerves associated with the switch from moderate to compulsive drinking were found to also have a role in learning and decision making. Researchers hope that their insights will be helpful in understanding alcoholism and addiction. Learning more about why some people can use substances in moderation while others become addicted is crucial to improving mental and physical health. Hopefully, these findings will also apply for humans.

Surgery residents operate less often under new rules

Medical residents (doctors who are done with medical school and are completing their practical training) work notoriously long shifts and even longer workweeks. Restrictions created in 2011 limited shifts to 16 hours for first-year residents and 28 hours for the more advanced doctors and everyone’s week is limited to 80 hours. Surgical residents have in turn participated in fewer hours of surgery because of the limits on working hours. Many doctors are concerned that this will put the budding surgeons at risk for not gaining enough experience. There has to be a balance between allowing doctors to get enough rest while also learning enough to practice on one’s own—the question is, how

Kathleen Sebelius may in fact have a sense of humor

Twitter blew up last night with references to Sharknado, a horribly wonderful movie about a tornado that blew sharks into a city. (I don’t know how that works, I didn’t watch it!) Buzzfeed immediately wrote an article claiming “There is no Obamacare coverage for pre-existing Sharknado injuries.” Kathleen Sebelius replied: https://twitter.com/Sebelius/status/355766513334108160 Hey, an ACA joke!

I leave you this weekend with an excellent infographic explaining pretty much everything you need to know about gender, sexual orientation, and the like…The Genderbread Person!

Genderbread-Person

Why we can't let Jenny McCarthy join The View

Jenny McCarthy’s dangerous vaccines-cause-autism message has been well catalogued and critiqued by writers across the Internet (you can start here, here, and here). But I hadn’t ventured far into her world until hearing the news that she was “in serious talks” to join the popular daytime talk show The View. Vaguely knowing that she advocates for some batty autism cures, I stuck my toe into the world that literally made her its president, Generation Rescue. My conclusion? If ABC makes the mistake of hiring her, and she brings her anti-doctor, anti-science rhetoric to The View, all of us concerned with spreading evidence-based information better be ready every day to combat her misinformation. McCarthy's book chronicling how she "cured" her son of autism.

A note about sources: finding balanced sources on vaccine safety is a tough task, and I found myself questioning both the Generation Rescue folks and the people criticizing them. Many of the sources I found are very biased and a link to them does not mean I endorse their message. As you find yourself going down the rabbit hole, remember to read everything skeptically. However, the best resource I found for anyone interested in the actual science regarding this issue is the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Vaccine Education Center.

I learned about the “Biomedical” approach to “curing” autism through a video McCarthy made a few years ago. Generation Rescue no longer has on its site, but YouTube squirreled it away for our viewing pleasure—Part 1 Part 2.  She goes into detail about how and why “Biomedical” is the only thing that makes sense for healing children with autism. I suggest you carve out fifteen minutes to watch it so you know what’s coming if she makes it onto The View.  Warning: the video may cause bouts of rage.

The two most important parts of the video are direct quotations from McCarthy that summarize the danger she poses to public health:

  1. After listing brand name supplements and referring viewers to Kirkman Laboratories to purchase them, McCarthy encourages parents to give supplements to children in order to “detox” them from yeast and toxins, and says, “If you’re unsure about dosage, ask your pediatrician.” Then she rolls her eyes. “Or, most of the time, they don’t know anything. So I would say, um, ask someone at Kirkman Laboratories.”

So here we have McCarthy herself telling us not to trust pediatricians. Rather, we should call up a company that sells allergen free supplements and ask them how much to give to children. She encourages us to trust salespeople over trained professionals, simply because she believes in what they’re selling. In her view, doctors are useless and possibly malicious.

2. Attesting to the power of positive thoughts, she invokes the book “The Secret” and says, “Whatever you think becomes your reality.”

This is some serious magical thinking. McCarthy believes that her wishes will come true. She imagined her own son being healed of autism, and lo and behold, he was! When all a person has to do is believe something is true, she has no need for scientific facts. Give that person a microphone, and she may be able to convince others that whatever they believe is the truth, too.

By lending her face and considerable charisma to the cause, McCarthy has already done serious damage to immunization levels across the country by raising the profile of misguided vaccine fears. Many states are below the necessary vaccination level to maintain herd immunity for pertussis, measles, and diphtheria. Herd immunity means that there is a certain percentage of the population that needs to be vaccinated against a disease in order to keep the unvaccinated safe. Vaccination keeps infectious diseases from spreading by containing the possibility of an outbreak. For example, in order to protect those who cannot be vaccinated—infants, pregnant women, etc. from measles, 92-94% of the population needs to be vaccinated against it. When immunization levels drop below 92%, the population is at risk for an outbreak and the same people who could not get the vaccine are now at risk for the disease.

The View is a daily show. If she’s hired, I’m sure McCarthy will talk about anything from insomnia to hair color to shoe insoles, if her Twitter feed is any indication. But it will only be a matter of time until the issue for which she is best known becomes part of the conversation. When it does, we must be ready to talk openly about the results of research and the reliability of doctors to give sound, proven advice. Though talking about it over and over may seem redundant or boring, the truth is that vaccine levels are declining and we must speak on behalf of public health.

In the meantime, tell ABC what you think about McCarthy joining The View. Phil Plait at Slate has an excellent example of the polite note he wrote and inspired me to write to them and make my note public. Here is what I wrote to them. Feel free to use some version of my letter if you’d like:

I strongly urge you not to hire Jenny McCarthy as a new co-host. She is the president of the group Operation Rescue, which advocates for practices that harm the public's health, especially avoiding vaccines. If she is hired by The View, she will have a daily opportunity to influence the health decisions of viewers. Please do not add to the ease with which bad and potentially dangerous health information is spread.

For more information, please see http://bit.ly/12pTOyW  

Sincerely,

Teagan Keating

Please take the time to write to ABC before they hire her. Because if she does make it onto the show, we’ll have to do a lot more than that.

Friday Five: Oklahoma tornado, MERS, 3D printing, polio, live-tweeting surgery

Each Friday, I use  five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week.  

Tornado in Moore, OK is the latest national disaster

On Monday, a mile wide tornado with 200+ mph winds decimated Moore, OK. Approximately 10,000 people were directly affected, 240 injured, and 24 killed, including nine children. Reports of heroism abound, as do shocking photos. Coming just months after the shooting at Sandy Hook and weeks after the Boston Marathon bombing, the Moore tornado victims may find themselves on the losing end of American disaster fatigue. Hopefully Moore will stay in the forefront of American’s minds and not blend in with other communities rebuilding from natural and human-made tragedies.

 

MERS is on the move

After a slow march toward notoriety, MERS is becoming a real threat. This novel coronavirus dubbed Middle East Respiratory Syndrome has been confirmed in 44 people across multiple countries and caused 22 deaths. In this month alone, two new outbreak clusters surfaced—one in Saudi Arabia infected 22 people and killed 10, the other in France infected two, one of whom contracted MERS from a hospital roommate. However, the exact mode of transmission, incubation period, and reservoir (meaning whether or not the virus lives someplace outside of humans) are unknown and research is stymied due to restrictions placed on the virus by Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands. For a virus with a 50% mortality rate so far, this is an egregious example of the problems with commercializing organisms needed for public health research. How many others will fall ill and die because of Erasmus’s patent?

 

Child’s life is saved by 3D printed trachea splint

In a groundbreaking and heartwarming use of the new technology of 3D printing, University of Michigan researchers created and implanted a trachea splint in a young child. Kaiba Gionnfrido, who had spent nearly all of his 20-month long life in a hospital on a respirator due to his trachobrochomalacia, or the softening and subsequent collapse of the windpipe. The splint, made to fit Kaiba perfectly, will give structure to his trachea to allow it to grow and is composed of a biopolymer that will be absorbed by his body in about three years. After years of requiring daily resuscitation, the splint allowed Kaiba to come off the respirator three weeks later. We can look forward to the emerging practice of saving lives using 3D printing to create custom-made medical devices.

 

Polio in Kenya and Somalia threatens eradication effort

A four-month old girl developed symptoms of paralysis and two other children tested positive for polio in a Kenyan refugee camp. Just a few weeks ago, Somalia reported its first wild case in five years. Vaccination rates in these areas are low, and nearly 500,000 people travel to and from the Kenyan refugee camp annually, increasing risk for an epidemic. This development complicates the newly adopted six year plan for polio eradication, and mass vaccination campaigns in the area are underway in hopes of containing the virus. Maintaining vaccination in vulnerable areas, even after years pass with no new infections, is crucial to destroying polio forever.

 

Brain surgery documented on Twitter and Vine

In this week’s example of how social media is revolutionizing health care and medicine, UCLA Hospital live tweeted Vine videos of brain surgery. Brad Carter, an actor and musician, underwent awake brain surgery to implant a pacemaker to calm his essential tremors. The Vine videos show distinct improvement in Carter’s guitar playing once the pacemaker was in place. By using Twitter and Vine to document the surgery, UCLA surgeons and Carter do the public a great service—showing exactly how incredible medicine can be. The videos inspire awe while simultaneously taking some of the mystery out of surgery.

 

This week's song to celebrate the end of the week: The Cure's "Friday I'm in Love"

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b69XWDUtMew]