Suicide prevention gets a new partner: Facebook

If you or anyone you know is having thoughts of self-harm, please reach out to organizations like the National Suicide Prevention Hotline or call their hotline directly at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). If you or someone you know is in immediate danger of self-harm, call 911 immediately. Your life is worth living and you don’t deserve to suffer.


Generally, my Facebook newsfeed is filled with silly photos of people waiting for the subway, declarations of love for a person’s partner, and snarky comments about current events. Sometimes, however, I see comments that make me concerned about someone’s mental health. I’ve been fortunate not to have seen anything that I felt needed to be reported, but I know that’s not the case for everyone.

Facebook announced yesterday that they are partnering with Forefront, Now Matters Now, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline, save.org, and other mental health organizations to create a more effective reporting program for people whose friends are expressing suicidal thoughts on Facebook.

When someone sees a friend's (let's call him Gerald) troubling post, they will have the option to report it directly to Facebook. Right now, at the upper right hand corner of every post, there’s a little downward arrow that, when you click on it, allows you to choose the option to report the post for potential suicidal content. (I haven’t been able to find screenshots of what that screen will look like, and the capability has not yet been activated on my account so I couldn’t make any of my own.)

The post will then be reviewed by “teams working around the world” to determine if the post does in fact imply that Gerald is in danger of self harming. If so, the next time Gerald logs into his account, he'll see this:

Facebook suicide prevention screen 1facebook_suicide_prevention_2facebook_suicide_prevention_3 Source: Huffington Post

One of the things that seems most promising is that Gerald doesn’t seem to have the option to dismiss these screens. He will have to at least click through the resources in order to get to their newsfeed. Hopefully, this will help reach some people who need help but aren’t able--for whatever reason--to ask for it or recieve it.

I also hope that Facebook is planning to critically evaluate this change. There are lots of unintended consequences that could arise from this new reporting system: a drop in posts containing potentially suicidal content, quick click-through speeds that imply users aren’t actually reading the resources, and gross misuse of the capability that floods the reviewing teams, making effective review difficult or impossible.

And when Facebook evaluates the initiative, I hope they make that information public. Because social media can provide a platform for mental health intervention, we need to know if a huge intervention like this is actually successful.

To learn more about this Facebook change, check out the Facebook Safety post explaining what’s happening.

Friday Five: Veterans, birth, ACA, Politifact, #HealthPolicyValentines

It's back by popular demand! (Okay, maybe only Carmen asked if I was ever going to write another Friday Five, but she's so awesome that she counts as at least ten people.) Each Friday, I use five sentences to summarize and comment on five important, interesting, or just plain amusing health stories from the week. Obama signs vet suicide prevention act Yesterday, President Obama signed the Clay Hunt Suicide Prevention for American Veterans Act, legislation aimed at improving the VA’s mental health care and removing barriers that prevent veterans from seeking treatment for mental health conditions. Death by suicide is particularly high among veterans over age 50. While their wish to end their lives may not be directly related to their service, the VA has a responsibility to care for veterans who qualify for VA care and are in need of it. The VA is notoriously problematic, and I hope that the newly-required external audits built into this Act will keep it accountable. After asking them to do what nearly every other American refuses to do, we continually fail our veterans--this Act is just a fraction of what they deserve.

Birth: Home versus hospital A short literature review by Dr. Rikki Lewis reveals interesting findings about the complexities and controversies surrounding home birth.

  • In the US, home births increased by 29% between 2004 and 2009.
  • Among studies investigating the risks and outcomes of home birth, there is little consistency in patient selection and the necessity of reporting infant deaths after transport to the hospital means that those deaths are reported as hospital deaths rather than deaths at home.
  • Policies for deciding to take a woman laboring at home are much clearer in the United Kingdom than in the US.
  • Home births are far less expensive than hospital births, which average about $20,000.

As the hospital versus home birth debate continues, it will be important to use correctly interpreted research as the basis for argument.

ACA open enrollment ends on Sunday The last day to sign up for insurance through the Marketplace is Sunday, February 15. According to the awesome website ACAsignups.net 10.5 million people have already signed up. Originally, the Department of Health and Human Services estimated that 13 million people would receive coverage during the open enrollment period, but later readjusted the estimate to between nine and ten million. If you need insurance and haven’t signed up, do it now...don’t procrastinate! (Also, can we take a moment to wonder why the “marketplace.gov” doesn’t redirect to healthcare.gov? Missed opportunity!)

 

Politifact takes on measles and vaccines One of the best, most useful sites ever, Politifact, evaluated the truthfulness of public statements about measles and vaccines. While their website could use a redesign to make articles like this one easier to read, the information they’ve provided is really valuable. They’re successful in debunking the “vaccines have mercury” claim and Rush Limbaugh’s accusation that Obama’s immigration policy allowed measles to enter the United States through Mexico. Politifact also highlights some of the true statements made by Megyn Kelly and other cable news pundits. While you’re reading their website, take a look at their ratings of statements about health care in general.

Health policy nerds love bad jokes Valentine’s Day isn’t only about romantic love. It can also be a time for you to express your deep, abiding passion for one of the nerdiest arms of public health: policy. Back in 2011, Emma Sandoe started the hashtag #HealthPolicyValentines so we could enjoy gems such as:

and

Groan worthy? Maybe, but totally great anyway.

Have an awesome Friday. I'll be back here tomorrow with a Valentine's Day-themed post!